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  • Via @coveringpotus: Sunday marked two years since President Trump took the oath of office, meaning that the first term of his presidency is halfway done. In that time, Trump has made 8,158 false or misleading claims, according to The Post's Fact Checker database that tracks every suspect statement made by the president. That includes 6,000-plus such claims that were made in the president’s second year in office. Put another way: The president averaged nearly 5.9 false or misleading claims a day in his first year in office. But he hit nearly 16.5 a day in his second year, almost triple the pace. The biggest source of misleading claims is immigration, with a tally that has grown with the addition of 300 immigration claims in the past three weeks, for a total of 1,433. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
  • Via @coveringpotus: Sunday marked two years since President Trump took the oath of office, meaning that the first term of his presidency is halfway done. In that time, Trump has made 8,158 false or misleading claims, according to The Post's Fact Checker database that tracks every suspect statement made by the president. That includes 6,000-plus such claims that were made in the president’s second year in office. Put another way: The president averaged nearly 5.9 false or misleading claims a day in his first year in office. But he hit nearly 16.5 a day in his second year, almost triple the pace. The biggest source of misleading claims is immigration, with a tally that has grown with the addition of 300 immigration claims in the past three weeks, for a total of 1,433. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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  • The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is seen in Washington on Monday, his federal holiday, when the nation honors his life, bravery and accomplishments. King’s birthday was Jan. 15, when he would have turned 90. The civil rights leader was assassinated in Memphis on April 4, 1968, by escaped convict and segregationist James Earl Ray. (Photo by @bonjomo/The Washington Post)
  • The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is seen in Washington on Monday, his federal holiday, when the nation honors his life, bravery and accomplishments. King’s birthday was Jan. 15, when he would have turned 90. The civil rights leader was assassinated in Memphis on April 4, 1968, by escaped convict and segregationist James Earl Ray. (Photo by @bonjomo/The Washington Post)
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  • On Sunday night, a total lunar eclipse bathed the moon in an eerie blood-red hue. From Hawaii to Maine, it could be seen in all 50 states — the most widely visible lunar eclipse in the country since October 2014. It was also a supermoon, meaning it was slightly closer to Earth than normal. Lunar eclipses occur when Earth passes directly between the sun and the moon, forming a straight line. This year, the moon was high in the sky, which made it the best chance to watch an eclipse in years. Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @newtonja/The Washington Post)
  • On Sunday night, a total lunar eclipse bathed the moon in an eerie blood-red hue. From Hawaii to Maine, it could be seen in all 50 states — the most widely visible lunar eclipse in the country since October 2014. It was also a supermoon, meaning it was slightly closer to Earth than normal. Lunar eclipses occur when Earth passes directly between the sun and the moon, forming a straight line. This year, the moon was high in the sky, which made it the best chance to watch an eclipse in years. Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @newtonja/The Washington Post)
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  • Sen. Kamala Harris of California officially joined the 2020 presidential race on Monday. The 54-year-old former prosecutor, who was raised in a state that has been the crucible of the Trump resistance, expanded a growing field of candidates fighting for the Democratic party’s nomination — a party that is increasingly nonwhite and fueled by women alienated by the president. She made the announcement during an interview on ABC’s “Good Morning America” and in a video that her campaign posted online. “The future of our country depends on you and millions of others lifting our voices to fight for our American values,” she said in the video. “That’s why I’m running for president of the United States.” Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP Photo)
  • Sen. Kamala Harris of California officially joined the 2020 presidential race on Monday. The 54-year-old former prosecutor, who was raised in a state that has been the crucible of the Trump resistance, expanded a growing field of candidates fighting for the Democratic party’s nomination — a party that is increasingly nonwhite and fueled by women alienated by the president. She made the announcement during an interview on ABC’s “Good Morning America” and in a video that her campaign posted online. “The future of our country depends on you and millions of others lifting our voices to fight for our American values,” she said in the video. “That’s why I’m running for president of the United States.” Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP Photo)
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  • The U.S. government has tried deploying tear gas, military helicopters and miles of razor wire to stop migrant caravans from crossing the southern border. But it only took one day for Nubia Estrada and her family to discover a way in. A group of men helped Estrada and her four children squeeze through a narrow gap in the fence on the westernmost part of the U.S.-Mexico border. The family sprinted into California, joining thousands of migrants who have made their way into the country to seek asylum despite increasingly urgent government efforts to stop them. In President Trump’s first two years in office, many of his administration's plans to curb border crossings and narrow migrants’ chances to qualify for asylum have been blocked or temporarily halted in federal courts, and the number of families coming in continues to rise. Some seek the relative safety and minimal cost of a locally organized caravan. Others are smuggled through remote, rugged passes. Estrada’s story illustrates why U.S. efforts to keep the families from entering the country are not succeeding — a combination of unrelenting demand, limited detention space, restrictions on how long children can be detained and how fast they can be deported. It also makes clear the significant obstacles that migrant parents and children face once they arrive. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Jenna Schoenefeld for The Washington Post)
  • The U.S. government has tried deploying tear gas, military helicopters and miles of razor wire to stop migrant caravans from crossing the southern border. But it only took one day for Nubia Estrada and her family to discover a way in. A group of men helped Estrada and her four children squeeze through a narrow gap in the fence on the westernmost part of the U.S.-Mexico border. The family sprinted into California, joining thousands of migrants who have made their way into the country to seek asylum despite increasingly urgent government efforts to stop them. In President Trump’s first two years in office, many of his administration's plans to curb border crossings and narrow migrants’ chances to qualify for asylum have been blocked or temporarily halted in federal courts, and the number of families coming in continues to rise. Some seek the relative safety and minimal cost of a locally organized caravan. Others are smuggled through remote, rugged passes. Estrada’s story illustrates why U.S. efforts to keep the families from entering the country are not succeeding — a combination of unrelenting demand, limited detention space, restrictions on how long children can be detained and how fast they can be deported. It also makes clear the significant obstacles that migrant parents and children face once they arrive. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Jenna Schoenefeld for The Washington Post)
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  • Via @coveringpotus: During a fiery CNN interview on Sunday, President Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani vehemently denied that Trump asked his former attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress and said @buzzfeednews should be sued for reporting the allegations this past week. Giuliani acknowledged that Trump might have spoken to Cohen about his testimony, but he shrugged it off, saying that would have been “perfectly normal.” “So what?” Giuliani said. “As far as I know, President Trump did not have discussions with him. Certainly no discussions with him in which he told him or counseled him to lie.” Special counsel Robert Mueller's office has issued a statement denying central aspects of a report from BuzzFeed claiming the president directed Cohen to lie to Congress about a deal to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. Giuliani blasted the news organization, which stands by its reporting, calling the story “scandalous” and “horrible.” He also said there's a "hysteria in the media that interprets everything against Donald Trump. What they did yesterday was truly fake news and disgusting.” Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
  • Via @coveringpotus: During a fiery CNN interview on Sunday, President Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani vehemently denied that Trump asked his former attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress and said @buzzfeednews should be sued for reporting the allegations this past week. Giuliani acknowledged that Trump might have spoken to Cohen about his testimony, but he shrugged it off, saying that would have been “perfectly normal.” “So what?” Giuliani said. “As far as I know, President Trump did not have discussions with him. Certainly no discussions with him in which he told him or counseled him to lie.” Special counsel Robert Mueller's office has issued a statement denying central aspects of a report from BuzzFeed claiming the president directed Cohen to lie to Congress about a deal to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. Giuliani blasted the news organization, which stands by its reporting, calling the story “scandalous” and “horrible.” He also said there's a "hysteria in the media that interprets everything against Donald Trump. What they did yesterday was truly fake news and disgusting.” Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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  • The Camp Fire, which devastated the town of Paradise, Calif., has left all but two of the small school system’s buildings shuttered. The fire incinerated many of the classrooms beyond recognition, leaving only the metal skeletons of tiny chairs arranged in rows and circles. Almost half of the town’s 3,400 students have left, many pushed into far-flung communities — or even other states — by an overwhelmed housing market. The calamity delivered unprecedented challenges for the town and the school system, and raised questions no one can seem to answer. How do you rebuild and reopen schools when your town has been leveled? Where do the children go in the meantime? When is it safe to allow them back in a community that fire turned into poisonous dust? And what if it happens again? Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photos by @mason_trinca)
  • The Camp Fire, which devastated the town of Paradise, Calif., has left all but two of the small school system’s buildings shuttered. The fire incinerated many of the classrooms beyond recognition, leaving only the metal skeletons of tiny chairs arranged in rows and circles. Almost half of the town’s 3,400 students have left, many pushed into far-flung communities — or even other states — by an overwhelmed housing market. The calamity delivered unprecedented challenges for the town and the school system, and raised questions no one can seem to answer. How do you rebuild and reopen schools when your town has been leveled? Where do the children go in the meantime? When is it safe to allow them back in a community that fire turned into poisonous dust? And what if it happens again? Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photos by @mason_trinca)
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  • The government shutdown has led organizations that help victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse to cut back on lifesaving services, furlough staff and turn people away from shelters. Many groups are heavily reliant on federal funding that was scheduled to stop being allocated on Jan. 18 amid the nearly month-long partial government shutdown. Advocates said the Justice Department decided hours before the deadline to extend the money until March 1, a temporary reprieve that allows them to restore services and keep staff employed. But already having come to the brink once during the political stalemate, such organizations across the country are still in flux, fretting that the patchwork solution might not outlast the shutdown. They are trying to save as much money as possible while refining staff furlough plans and talking to victims for the first time about operating budgets. hat the shelters experienced in recent days is symbolic of the broader shutdown: uncertainty, fear, contingency planning and an 11th hour reprieve, at least tentatively. In this photo, a client who has suffered from domestic abuse is seen at the Eastern Panhandle Empowerment Center women's shelter in Martinsburg, WV. The shelter has frozen spending and funds for the center during the partial government shutdown. Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)
  • The government shutdown has led organizations that help victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse to cut back on lifesaving services, furlough staff and turn people away from shelters. Many groups are heavily reliant on federal funding that was scheduled to stop being allocated on Jan. 18 amid the nearly month-long partial government shutdown. Advocates said the Justice Department decided hours before the deadline to extend the money until March 1, a temporary reprieve that allows them to restore services and keep staff employed. But already having come to the brink once during the political stalemate, such organizations across the country are still in flux, fretting that the patchwork solution might not outlast the shutdown. They are trying to save as much money as possible while refining staff furlough plans and talking to victims for the first time about operating budgets. hat the shelters experienced in recent days is symbolic of the broader shutdown: uncertainty, fear, contingency planning and an 11th hour reprieve, at least tentatively. In this photo, a client who has suffered from domestic abuse is seen at the Eastern Panhandle Empowerment Center women's shelter in Martinsburg, WV. The shelter has frozen spending and funds for the center during the partial government shutdown. Read more on washingtonpost.com. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)
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  • Via @coveringpotus: President Trump made a new offer Saturday to Democrats aimed at ending the 29-day partial government shutdown that would extend deportation protections for some immigrants in exchange for $5.7 billion in border wall funding. Trump’s proposal is designed to ramp up pressure on Democrats by offering a reprieve on his attempts to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and temporary protected status (TPS) for immigrants from some Latin American and African nations. Under the new proposal, the administration would allow those programs to continue — addressing a key concern of Democrats and some moderate Republicans. Some Democrats rejected Trump’s offer as unacceptable before it was officially announced. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) called it a “non-starter” and implored Trump to take action to open the government. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
  • Via @coveringpotus: President Trump made a new offer Saturday to Democrats aimed at ending the 29-day partial government shutdown that would extend deportation protections for some immigrants in exchange for $5.7 billion in border wall funding. Trump’s proposal is designed to ramp up pressure on Democrats by offering a reprieve on his attempts to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and temporary protected status (TPS) for immigrants from some Latin American and African nations. Under the new proposal, the administration would allow those programs to continue — addressing a key concern of Democrats and some moderate Republicans. Some Democrats rejected Trump’s offer as unacceptable before it was officially announced. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) called it a “non-starter” and implored Trump to take action to open the government. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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  • Women from across the country were marching through the nation’s capital Saturday for the third annual Women’s March on Washington, which has been dogged by controversy in the months leading to the event. Organizers weeks ago expected hundreds of thousands to attend — a number similar to the 2017 march the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration — but it appeared thousands had joined the march as the event got underway. A National Park Service permit issued Thursday indicated about 10,000 were expected in Washington as similar marches were planned across the country. (Photo by Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post)
  • Women from across the country were marching through the nation’s capital Saturday for the third annual Women’s March on Washington, which has been dogged by controversy in the months leading to the event. Organizers weeks ago expected hundreds of thousands to attend — a number similar to the 2017 march the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration — but it appeared thousands had joined the march as the event got underway. A National Park Service permit issued Thursday indicated about 10,000 were expected in Washington as similar marches were planned across the country. (Photo by Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post)
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  • Thousands of women from across the country gathered in the nation’s capital Saturday morning for the third annual Women’s March on Washington. The 2019 march is taking place amid controversies that have dogged the national Women’s March organization, including allegations of anti-Semitism and secretive financial dealings and disputes over who gets to own and define the Women’s March. Some organizers have called for its national co-chairs to resign. Hoards of high school students, parents and older protesters headed to Freedom Plaza past the calls of vendors: “Dump Trump! Get your Pink Pussy hats here!” Protesters carried signs that were playful and pointed, including “Wonder Woman in a pink pussy hat,” “Our Rights Are Real,” and “Protect Women.” (Photos by @salwangeorges/The Washington Post)
  • Thousands of women from across the country gathered in the nation’s capital Saturday morning for the third annual Women’s March on Washington. The 2019 march is taking place amid controversies that have dogged the national Women’s March organization, including allegations of anti-Semitism and secretive financial dealings and disputes over who gets to own and define the Women’s March. Some organizers have called for its national co-chairs to resign. Hoards of high school students, parents and older protesters headed to Freedom Plaza past the calls of vendors: “Dump Trump! Get your Pink Pussy hats here!” Protesters carried signs that were playful and pointed, including “Wonder Woman in a pink pussy hat,” “Our Rights Are Real,” and “Protect Women.” (Photos by @salwangeorges/The Washington Post)
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  • The Coast Guard’s newest class of personnel completed boot camp here with two graduation gifts from Washington: no paychecks and no money to send them all to their first assignments. Unlike the Defense Department’s branches of the military, the Coast Guard is operating without a budget, marking the first time in more than a century that part of the armed forces has had paychecks withheld. While Congress has approved funding for the Defense Department, the Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security, whose agencies are affected by the shutdown. Active-duty personnel are “essential workers,” working for free with the promise of back pay when a spending deal is passed — but they have no idea when that money will come. Service members are prohibited from talking to the media during the shutdown, but several Coast Guard spouses said they are increasingly worrying about paying their bills, cutting spending where they can and visiting an ad hoc food pantry set up on base to feed their families. If the paychecks due at the end of January also are withheld, the consequences will be grave, they said. (Photos by @mswontheroad/The Washington Post)
  • The Coast Guard’s newest class of personnel completed boot camp here with two graduation gifts from Washington: no paychecks and no money to send them all to their first assignments. Unlike the Defense Department’s branches of the military, the Coast Guard is operating without a budget, marking the first time in more than a century that part of the armed forces has had paychecks withheld. While Congress has approved funding for the Defense Department, the Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security, whose agencies are affected by the shutdown. Active-duty personnel are “essential workers,” working for free with the promise of back pay when a spending deal is passed — but they have no idea when that money will come. Service members are prohibited from talking to the media during the shutdown, but several Coast Guard spouses said they are increasingly worrying about paying their bills, cutting spending where they can and visiting an ad hoc food pantry set up on base to feed their families. If the paychecks due at the end of January also are withheld, the consequences will be grave, they said. (Photos by @mswontheroad/The Washington Post)
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