Vogue Italia @vogueitalia

vogueitalia

Vogue Italia Framing fashion since 1964. Join our Vogue Italia community, your daily inspiration for fashion, photography and talent #vogueitalia

Vogue Italia (@vogueitalia) Recent Photos and Videos

  • ‘Cento per Cento Magazine’ An interview with #VinceAletti by @alessiaglaviano in our June Issue. ‘I think it is important to see fashion images in the context that they were originally presented: the pages of a magazine. Because I think the best fashion photographers understood that that’s how the pictures were going to be received and that is how they needed to be designed, and because I would say, 99% of those pictures wouldn’t exist off the page. A lot of what interests me only exists on the page. It is not designed to be seen one-by-one or in a frame. This is a big part of what I love about fashion photography: the sequencing, the design of the page, the graphics, just the immediacy of holding a magazine.’ All the greatest fashion photographers have conceived and created their best works for fashion publications. With Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines, Vince Aletti, one of the most acclaimed writers, critics and curators on the international scene, has put together one of the most interesting, original and well informed volumes ever written on the history of fashion photography, chronicling its parable from 1925 to 2018 by presenting his most favourite 100 fashion magazine issues out of his extensive personal archive. @phaidonsnaps
Keep reading the interview with him via link in bio. 
Portrait by #StevanHaas
  • ‘Cento per Cento Magazine’ An interview with #vincealetti by @alessiaglaviano in our June Issue. ‘I think it is important to see fashion images in the context that they were originally presented: the pages of a magazine. Because I think the best fashion photographers understood that that’s how the pictures were going to be received and that is how they needed to be designed, and because I would say, 99% of those pictures wouldn’t exist off the page. A lot of what interests me only exists on the page. It is not designed to be seen one-by-one or in a frame. This is a big part of what I love about fashion photography: the sequencing, the design of the page, the graphics, just the immediacy of holding a magazine.’ All the greatest fashion photographers have conceived and created their best works for fashion publications. With Issues: A History of Photography in Fashion Magazines, Vince Aletti, one of the most acclaimed writers, critics and curators on the international scene, has put together one of the most interesting, original and well informed volumes ever written on the history of fashion photography, chronicling its parable from 1925 to 2018 by presenting his most favourite 100 fashion magazine issues out of his extensive personal archive. @phaidonsnaps Keep reading the interview with him via link in bio. Portrait by #stevanhaas
  • 1017 0 7 hours ago
  • @rickowensonline interviewed by @luke_leitch featured in the new June Issue of @luomovogue dedicated to unique people. No designer in fashion sails against its prevailing winds as consistently as #RickOwens. By charting his own course, he has created an aesthetic that transcends the conventional demographics of taste. So what makes Owens Owens?
The first NY show, in 2002, was the result of his sudden propulsion down one of the fashion landscape’s most tumultuous but potentially fruitful rapids: hearty support from American Vogue. In short order this led to a CFDA Perry Ellis Award, his hiring by a French fur house, and a move in 2003 with Lamy to Paris to do that job and build his own line. ‘I was tempted not to do it because I was thinking then that my aesthetic was pretty narrow, very grey, and black and white - just me and my vision. And how long would that really last in this faster world? I thought I could stay quietly designing, selling to a few stores and doing my thing. Or I could step into the spotlight, in which case I’d have to be completely new every season, and that really intimidated me. But it’s not intimidating anymore. Because I learnt how to extend that vision. And also what was really great, and what I’m very grateful for, is that somehow the fashion world decided to tolerate my pace. And my pace is different from everybody else’s.’ Read the full interview with him in our Originality Issue and via link in bio. 
Portrait by @daniellelevitt
#LUOMOriginality
#theOriginalityIssue
  • @rickowensonline interviewed by @luke_leitch featured in the new June Issue of @luomovogue dedicated to unique people. No designer in fashion sails against its prevailing winds as consistently as #rickowens. By charting his own course, he has created an aesthetic that transcends the conventional demographics of taste. So what makes Owens Owens? The first NY show, in 2002, was the result of his sudden propulsion down one of the fashion landscape’s most tumultuous but potentially fruitful rapids: hearty support from American Vogue. In short order this led to a CFDA Perry Ellis Award, his hiring by a French fur house, and a move in 2003 with Lamy to Paris to do that job and build his own line. ‘I was tempted not to do it because I was thinking then that my aesthetic was pretty narrow, very grey, and black and white - just me and my vision. And how long would that really last in this faster world? I thought I could stay quietly designing, selling to a few stores and doing my thing. Or I could step into the spotlight, in which case I’d have to be completely new every season, and that really intimidated me. But it’s not intimidating anymore. Because I learnt how to extend that vision. And also what was really great, and what I’m very grateful for, is that somehow the fashion world decided to tolerate my pace. And my pace is different from everybody else’s.’ Read the full interview with him in our Originality Issue and via link in bio. Portrait by @daniellelevitt #luomoriginality #theoriginalityissue
  • 2297 0 9 hours ago
  • @ibkamara interviewed by #MartaGalli in @luomovogue’s new Issue dedicated to unique people. ‘Since a very young age I was fascinated by images, so somehow I knew I was going to end up not doing what my parents wanted me to do. But I did have no choice, in Africa. And when I moved to England, I still had no choice, because I didn’t know who I was. Nevertheless, after three years of studying sciences, when it was almost time to go to university, I told myself: ‘I am never going to be happy with this.’ So, I brought it up with my parents and they got very upset. They suggested I should take a year off to clear my head - and after a year working in hotels, retails and interning in a magazine, I took my decision.’ #IbrahimKamara
There was a moment in 1980s that changed fashion. Called Buffalo, it was a creative collision that saw an Armani suit place above a pair of Dr. Martens, dressing a boy in men’s clothes, or the styling of men in skirts. Today the spirit of Buffalo has been passed down to 28-year-old stylist Ibrahim Kamara, who is applying the same nonconformist verve, informed by his own roots, to create a sharp and disorienting visual language. 
Read the full interview with him in our Originality Issue and via link in bio.
Portrait by @kristinleemoolman
#LUOMOriginality
#theOriginalityIssue
  • @ibkamara interviewed by #martagalli in @luomovogue’s new Issue dedicated to unique people. ‘Since a very young age I was fascinated by images, so somehow I knew I was going to end up not doing what my parents wanted me to do. But I did have no choice, in Africa. And when I moved to England, I still had no choice, because I didn’t know who I was. Nevertheless, after three years of studying sciences, when it was almost time to go to university, I told myself: ‘I am never going to be happy with this.’ So, I brought it up with my parents and they got very upset. They suggested I should take a year off to clear my head - and after a year working in hotels, retails and interning in a magazine, I took my decision.’ #ibrahimkamara There was a moment in 1980s that changed fashion. Called Buffalo, it was a creative collision that saw an Armani suit place above a pair of Dr. Martens, dressing a boy in men’s clothes, or the styling of men in skirts. Today the spirit of Buffalo has been passed down to 28-year-old stylist Ibrahim Kamara, who is applying the same nonconformist verve, informed by his own roots, to create a sharp and disorienting visual language. Read the full interview with him in our Originality Issue and via link in bio. Portrait by @kristinleemoolman #luomoriginality #theoriginalityissue
  • 1933 0 1 day ago