Angela Tate @theglamorousacademic

theglamorousacademic

Angela Tate Telling a story, one black woman at a time //📍Chicago • Northwestern PhD student // Art + Music + Fashion + Food // 🏠 Sacramento California ☀️🏞

Angela Tate (@theglamorousacademic) Recent Photos and Videos

  • Some of my favorite garden IG accounts --- @beinggreenwhileblack @blackmenwithgardens @eargardn @theblackplanter @blackgirlswithgardens @blackplanted @blkandgrn -- combined with conversations about environmental justice and public health, and the relationship between culture and place/space, have me ruminating on black environmental history. Dianne D. Glave meditates on this in her book "Rooted in the Earth: Reclaiming the African American Environmental Heritage." *
*
Until I moved away from California, I was unaware of how much the landscape--from soaring mountain ranges to rolling green lines of agriculture to the crashing waves against the beach--affected my life and the way I interacted with the world. Even after two years of living in the Midwest, I remain unsettled, frequently taken aback by this new landscape forcibly remaking even my tiniest decisions, such as where I am accustomed to going for relaxation (I really miss living fifteen minutes away from the mountains!!). It makes me think of the millions who left the soil of their birth to travel north and west, or the millions more left behind, and how much this current impulse to grow things in our concrete-based environments are rooted in a unconscious or perhaps conscious effort to reclaim that lost earth and the stories rooted within.

#beinggreenwhileblack #americansouth #gardening #green #plants #1930s #greatmigration #soil #earth #environment
  • Some of my favorite garden IG accounts --- @beinggreenwhileblack @blackmenwithgardens @eargardn @theblackplanter @blackgirlswithgardens @blackplanted @blkandgrn -- combined with conversations about environmental justice and public health, and the relationship between culture and place/space, have me ruminating on black environmental history. Dianne D. Glave meditates on this in her book "Rooted in the Earth: Reclaiming the African American Environmental Heritage." * * Until I moved away from California, I was unaware of how much the landscape--from soaring mountain ranges to rolling green lines of agriculture to the crashing waves against the beach--affected my life and the way I interacted with the world. Even after two years of living in the Midwest, I remain unsettled, frequently taken aback by this new landscape forcibly remaking even my tiniest decisions, such as where I am accustomed to going for relaxation (I really miss living fifteen minutes away from the mountains!!). It makes me think of the millions who left the soil of their birth to travel north and west, or the millions more left behind, and how much this current impulse to grow things in our concrete-based environments are rooted in a unconscious or perhaps conscious effort to reclaim that lost earth and the stories rooted within. #beinggreenwhileblack #americansouth #gardening #green #plants #1930s #greatmigration #soil #earth #environment
  • 133 7 3 days ago
  • Dr. Maya Angelou was not just a poet with a stately, elegant delivery style; her artistry was all-encompassing and rooted firmly in pan-African cultural expressions of heritage and politics. *
*
*
As a dancer, trained under Pearl Primus and partnered with Alvin Ailey, Angelou stood on the shoulders of other black women dance-anthropologists like Katherine Dunham, Josephine Baker, the aforementioned Primus, and others. As a performer, she also hit the stage in a critical moment in the 1950s and 1960s where syncretic African rhythms circulated across the Atlantic, from highlife (Ghana) to tropicalia (Brazil) to calypso (Trinidad and Tobago), to name a few. *
*
*
Here she is in 1957, performing "|Run Joe" in a San Francisco nightclub. This was a track on her sole album release, Miss Calypso.
*
#1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #calypso #mayaangelou #dancing #nightclub #1950smusic #blackdancers #musichistory #poets
  • Dr. Maya Angelou was not just a poet with a stately, elegant delivery style; her artistry was all-encompassing and rooted firmly in pan-African cultural expressions of heritage and politics. * * * As a dancer, trained under Pearl Primus and partnered with Alvin Ailey, Angelou stood on the shoulders of other black women dance-anthropologists like Katherine Dunham, Josephine Baker, the aforementioned Primus, and others. As a performer, she also hit the stage in a critical moment in the 1950s and 1960s where syncretic African rhythms circulated across the Atlantic, from highlife (Ghana) to tropicalia (Brazil) to calypso (Trinidad and Tobago), to name a few. * * * Here she is in 1957, performing "|Run Joe" in a San Francisco nightclub. This was a track on her sole album release, Miss Calypso. * #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #calypso #mayaangelou #dancing #nightclub #1950smusic #blackdancers #musichistory #poets
  • 286 7 1 month ago
  • A home movie by Marie Dickerson Coker, where she models a green outfit in front of her Los Angeles home (1943)
*
*
Coker was a pilot, actress, musician, and dancer, and her collection of home movies offer a snapshot of black life in 1940s Los Angeles. Though Los Angeles had a  sizable black population in the early 20th century, migration West exploded in the 1930s and 1940s, undoubtedly in response to jobs and the promise of freedom from the Jim Crow South and segregation in the North. *
Coker's own migration from Tulsa, Oklahoma to SoCal, where she joined one of the only all-black aviation troupes (she earned her pilot's license in 1931, inspired by Bessie Coleman), and later branched into the entertainment industry, reveals the types of experiences of Black California. Coker's films were preserved by her cousin, Mayme A. Clayton, who, in the 1960s began collecting materials about the black experience. *
Clayton, a librarian and historian, also contributed to Black Los Angeles history with the establishment of what is now known as the Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum (Culver City), where Coker's papers are held, as well as the breadth of black Hollywood history, magazines, books, and more.
*
#blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #1940s #losangeles #aviation #aviationhistory #blackcinema #8mm #homemovies #1940sfashion #museum #blackcalifornia #bessiecoleman #maymeclayton
  • A home movie by Marie Dickerson Coker, where she models a green outfit in front of her Los Angeles home (1943) * * Coker was a pilot, actress, musician, and dancer, and her collection of home movies offer a snapshot of black life in 1940s Los Angeles. Though Los Angeles had a sizable black population in the early 20th century, migration West exploded in the 1930s and 1940s, undoubtedly in response to jobs and the promise of freedom from the Jim Crow South and segregation in the North. * Coker's own migration from Tulsa, Oklahoma to SoCal, where she joined one of the only all-black aviation troupes (she earned her pilot's license in 1931, inspired by Bessie Coleman), and later branched into the entertainment industry, reveals the types of experiences of Black California. Coker's films were preserved by her cousin, Mayme A. Clayton, who, in the 1960s began collecting materials about the black experience. * Clayton, a librarian and historian, also contributed to Black Los Angeles history with the establishment of what is now known as the Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum (Culver City), where Coker's papers are held, as well as the breadth of black Hollywood history, magazines, books, and more. * #blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #1940s #losangeles #aviation #aviationhistory #blackcinema #8mm #homemovies #1940sfashion #museum #blackcalifornia #bessiecoleman #maymeclayton
  • 139 9 2 months ago
  • Toni Morrison and Audre Lorde share a birthday--February 18. A fitting connection, since the words that strike me when thinking of their work is love, beauty, art, and courage. The committment to seeing these things as black women, for black women, about black women, is powerful. *
In a world where black women are often ignored or erased or othered--not quite woman, or human--Morrison and Lorde both ask us to celebrate the intimacies of black women's experiences. To nurture those nooks and crannies of ourselves that the world often wants to punish us for. There, in the love often denied, the beauty often distorted, the art often misrepresented and commodified, is the source of courage.
*
*
#blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #literature #feminist #blackfeminists #tonimorrison #audrelorde #blacklgbt #birthday #blackwriters #womenwriters
  • Toni Morrison and Audre Lorde share a birthday--February 18. A fitting connection, since the words that strike me when thinking of their work is love, beauty, art, and courage. The committment to seeing these things as black women, for black women, about black women, is powerful. * In a world where black women are often ignored or erased or othered--not quite woman, or human--Morrison and Lorde both ask us to celebrate the intimacies of black women's experiences. To nurture those nooks and crannies of ourselves that the world often wants to punish us for. There, in the love often denied, the beauty often distorted, the art often misrepresented and commodified, is the source of courage. * * #blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #literature #feminist #blackfeminists #tonimorrison #audrelorde #blacklgbt #birthday #blackwriters #womenwriters
  • 111 9 2 months ago
  • Muriel Smith, as Carmen, in the 1956 revival at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. *
Perhaps it is her mostly London-based career that keeps Smith from being remembered in the same breath as Leontyne Price or Marian Anderson. She moved across the Atlantic in 1949 after a solid career on the stage and airwaves of the US entertainment industry. *
She made her debut as the titular character in the 1943 Broadway debut of Carmen Jones--a far cry from her humble beginnings as a factory worker whose salary supported her studies at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia (where she was also the first African American student). *
In England she became the toast of the theater world through her starring roles in South Pacific and The King and I, as well as her skill as a singer of lieder--a type of German song. Smith was also hired as the singing voice in Hollywood musicals like the film adaptation of The King and I. During the beginnings of the civil rights movement in the US, Smith used her talent to bring to audiences, a musical about the life of Mary McLeod Bethune (which was later adapted for film)*
*
*
#blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #opera #operahistory #theaterhistory #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #carmenjones #1950slondon #broadway #royaloperahouse #operasingers #blackhistorymonth
  • Muriel Smith, as Carmen, in the 1956 revival at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. * Perhaps it is her mostly London-based career that keeps Smith from being remembered in the same breath as Leontyne Price or Marian Anderson. She moved across the Atlantic in 1949 after a solid career on the stage and airwaves of the US entertainment industry. * She made her debut as the titular character in the 1943 Broadway debut of Carmen Jones--a far cry from her humble beginnings as a factory worker whose salary supported her studies at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia (where she was also the first African American student). * In England she became the toast of the theater world through her starring roles in South Pacific and The King and I, as well as her skill as a singer of lieder--a type of German song. Smith was also hired as the singing voice in Hollywood musicals like the film adaptation of The King and I. During the beginnings of the civil rights movement in the US, Smith used her talent to bring to audiences, a musical about the life of Mary McLeod Bethune (which was later adapted for film)* * * #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #opera #operahistory #theaterhistory #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #carmenjones #1950slondon #broadway #royaloperahouse #operasingers #blackhistorymonth
  • 106 2 2 months ago
  • Frederick Douglass is not a black woman, but three things: he was an ardent supporter of women's rights, he chose Valentine's Day as his birthday, and he practically passed the baton of civil rights activism to Ida B. Wells before his death (now, was it honored by the black leaders of the day? That's another story). *
Douglass was also the most photographed man of the 19th century. If that's not an ode to self love--assertion of one's humanity, and a testament of service to the oppressed--I don't know what is! It reminds me of both Beyonce's assertion of herself in the self-titled album and Solange's own artistic experience of sharing A Seat at the Table with us. It also reminds me of the millions of regular people who use Instagram to show themselves to the world, assert their presence, and build a community. *
Selfies, self-titled, art, performance, unapologetically claiming yourself and your image, is a revolutionary act across history.
*
So whether you're partnered up, wish you were, or have no interest right now, use Valentine's Day to reflect on the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass and the radical act of taking a picture of yourself.

#frederickdouglass #happybirthday #valentinesday #selfportrait #blackhistorymonth #oldphoto #civilrights #blackactivists #sepia #nineteenthcentury #selffashioning #selfie
  • Frederick Douglass is not a black woman, but three things: he was an ardent supporter of women's rights, he chose Valentine's Day as his birthday, and he practically passed the baton of civil rights activism to Ida B. Wells before his death (now, was it honored by the black leaders of the day? That's another story). * Douglass was also the most photographed man of the 19th century. If that's not an ode to self love--assertion of one's humanity, and a testament of service to the oppressed--I don't know what is! It reminds me of both Beyonce's assertion of herself in the self-titled album and Solange's own artistic experience of sharing A Seat at the Table with us. It also reminds me of the millions of regular people who use Instagram to show themselves to the world, assert their presence, and build a community. * Selfies, self-titled, art, performance, unapologetically claiming yourself and your image, is a revolutionary act across history. * So whether you're partnered up, wish you were, or have no interest right now, use Valentine's Day to reflect on the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass and the radical act of taking a picture of yourself. #frederickdouglass #happybirthday #valentinesday #selfportrait #blackhistorymonth #oldphoto #civilrights #blackactivists #sepia #nineteenthcentury #selffashioning #selfie
  • 100 1 2 months ago
  • The great Hazel Scott playing two pianos in a scene from 1943's The Heat's On. This feat of musical dexterity is astonishing and wonderful, and yet...it speaks to the restrictions that Jim Crow placed on black artists. *
Films made during the Golden Age of Hollywood increasingly featured musical interludes by popular black jazz musicians for the spectacle of their performances. However, spectacle was all that was expected, not marvel over their professional training, and most if not all interludes were filmed to allow Southern movie houses to cut their scenes from the print. However, Scott not only demanded a say in the final cut but she wore her own wardrobe if the studio attempted to dress her in costume she disliked. She was also expected to conform to images of black women's respectability--but as you can see here, her very presence on a stage, on the silver screen, contends with this notion.
*
The Trinidadian born Scott, who by now was married to Reverend Adam Clayton Powell Jr, used her talent to fight against segregation and racism. She was the first black woman to have her own television show, until the Red Scare of the 1950s found her blacklisted. She continued her career in Europe until the late 1960s, but continued to be outspoken against racism, segregation, and other oppressions.
*
#hazelscott #goldenage #oldhollywood #pianist #blackwomen #musicians #1940s #1940sfashion #1940sfilm #blackpianists #aliciakeys #blackhistorymonth
  • The great Hazel Scott playing two pianos in a scene from 1943's The Heat's On. This feat of musical dexterity is astonishing and wonderful, and yet...it speaks to the restrictions that Jim Crow placed on black artists. * Films made during the Golden Age of Hollywood increasingly featured musical interludes by popular black jazz musicians for the spectacle of their performances. However, spectacle was all that was expected, not marvel over their professional training, and most if not all interludes were filmed to allow Southern movie houses to cut their scenes from the print. However, Scott not only demanded a say in the final cut but she wore her own wardrobe if the studio attempted to dress her in costume she disliked. She was also expected to conform to images of black women's respectability--but as you can see here, her very presence on a stage, on the silver screen, contends with this notion. * The Trinidadian born Scott, who by now was married to Reverend Adam Clayton Powell Jr, used her talent to fight against segregation and racism. She was the first black woman to have her own television show, until the Red Scare of the 1950s found her blacklisted. She continued her career in Europe until the late 1960s, but continued to be outspoken against racism, segregation, and other oppressions. * #hazelscott #goldenage #oldhollywood #pianist #blackwomen #musicians #1940s #1940sfashion #1940sfilm #blackpianists #aliciakeys #blackhistorymonth
  • 250 7 2 months ago
  • Diana Ross performing one of my favorite songs in her catalog--Love Hangover--on Burt Sugarman's The Midnight Special. This was a late night variety show that aired on NBC from 1972-1981. "Love Hangover" was also Diana Ross's fourth number one hit. Hope to hear it tonight at the Grammy's, where Ms. Ross is celebrating her birthday and marvelous career with a special performance!

#1970s #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #dianaross #tvhistory #grammys #disco
  • Diana Ross performing one of my favorite songs in her catalog--Love Hangover--on Burt Sugarman's The Midnight Special. This was a late night variety show that aired on NBC from 1972-1981. "Love Hangover" was also Diana Ross's fourth number one hit. Hope to hear it tonight at the Grammy's, where Ms. Ross is celebrating her birthday and marvelous career with a special performance! #1970s #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #dianaross #tvhistory #grammys #disco
  • 341 16 2 months ago
  • You probably know her as Aunt Viv the Second, but Daphne Maxwell Reid broke barriers as the first black woman chosen as Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University (where she received a degree in architecture and interior design) and as the first black woman on the cover of Glamour Magazine. *
In //Ain't I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race,// Maxine Leeds Craig describes the stakes the Black Power movement placed on beauty pageants for black students at predominantly white colleges in the 1960s. As the headline on this issue of JET magazine states, Reid was one of many black women who won their crown on white campuses. To win was not only an achievement in itself, but a fight for integration and against particular beauty standards (though, admittedly, Reid is light-skinned and her hair is straightened--which speaks to the tensions of black representation, particularly when it comes to black women).
*
#1960s #blackwomen #blackpower #homecomingqueen #northwestern #beautypageant #beauty #civilrightsmovement #jetmagazine #models #blackhistorymonth #blackfirsts
  • You probably know her as Aunt Viv the Second, but Daphne Maxwell Reid broke barriers as the first black woman chosen as Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University (where she received a degree in architecture and interior design) and as the first black woman on the cover of Glamour Magazine. * In //Ain't I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race,// Maxine Leeds Craig describes the stakes the Black Power movement placed on beauty pageants for black students at predominantly white colleges in the 1960s. As the headline on this issue of JET magazine states, Reid was one of many black women who won their crown on white campuses. To win was not only an achievement in itself, but a fight for integration and against particular beauty standards (though, admittedly, Reid is light-skinned and her hair is straightened--which speaks to the tensions of black representation, particularly when it comes to black women). * #1960s #blackwomen #blackpower #homecomingqueen #northwestern #beautypageant #beauty #civilrightsmovement #jetmagazine #models #blackhistorymonth #blackfirsts
  • 114 1 2 months ago