The #GLAMorous Academic @theglamorousacademic

theglamorousacademic

The #GLAMorous Academic PhD student, Archivist & Digital Storyteller investigating black women in art, fashion, sound, memory, dance + visual culture across the Atlantic.

The #GLAMorous Academic (@theglamorousacademic) Recent Photos and Videos

  • A home movie by Marie Dickerson Coker, where she models a green outfit in front of her Los Angeles home (1943)
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Coker was a pilot, actress, musician, and dancer, and her collection of home movies offer a snapshot of black life in 1940s Los Angeles. Though Los Angeles had a  sizable black population in the early 20th century, migration West exploded in the 1930s and 1940s, undoubtedly in response to jobs and the promise of freedom from the Jim Crow South and segregation in the North. *
Coker's own migration from Tulsa, Oklahoma to SoCal, where she joined one of the only all-black aviation troupes (she earned her pilot's license in 1931, inspired by Bessie Coleman), and later branched into the entertainment industry, reveals the types of experiences of Black California. Coker's films were preserved by her cousin, Mayme A. Clayton, who, in the 1960s began collecting materials about the black experience. *
Clayton, a librarian and historian, also contributed to Black Los Angeles history with the establishment of what is now known as the Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum (Culver City), where Coker's papers are held, as well as the breadth of black Hollywood history, magazines, books, and more.
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#blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #1940s #losangeles #aviation #aviationhistory #blackcinema #8mm #homemovies #1940sfashion #museum #blackcalifornia #bessiecoleman #maymeclayton
  • A home movie by Marie Dickerson Coker, where she models a green outfit in front of her Los Angeles home (1943) * * Coker was a pilot, actress, musician, and dancer, and her collection of home movies offer a snapshot of black life in 1940s Los Angeles. Though Los Angeles had a sizable black population in the early 20th century, migration West exploded in the 1930s and 1940s, undoubtedly in response to jobs and the promise of freedom from the Jim Crow South and segregation in the North. * Coker's own migration from Tulsa, Oklahoma to SoCal, where she joined one of the only all-black aviation troupes (she earned her pilot's license in 1931, inspired by Bessie Coleman), and later branched into the entertainment industry, reveals the types of experiences of Black California. Coker's films were preserved by her cousin, Mayme A. Clayton, who, in the 1960s began collecting materials about the black experience. * Clayton, a librarian and historian, also contributed to Black Los Angeles history with the establishment of what is now known as the Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum (Culver City), where Coker's papers are held, as well as the breadth of black Hollywood history, magazines, books, and more. * #blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #1940s #losangeles #aviation #aviationhistory #blackcinema #8mm #homemovies #1940sfashion #museum #blackcalifornia #bessiecoleman #maymeclayton
  • 131 9 3 days ago
  • Toni Morrison and Audre Lorde share a birthday--February 18. A fitting connection, since the words that strike me when thinking of their work is love, beauty, art, and courage. The committment to seeing these things as black women, for black women, about black women, is powerful. *
In a world where black women are often ignored or erased or othered--not quite woman, or human--Morrison and Lorde both ask us to celebrate the intimacies of black women's experiences. To nurture those nooks and crannies of ourselves that the world often wants to punish us for. There, in the love often denied, the beauty often distorted, the art often misrepresented and commodified, is the source of courage.
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#blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #literature #feminist #blackfeminists #tonimorrison #audrelorde #blacklgbt #birthday #blackwriters #womenwriters
  • Toni Morrison and Audre Lorde share a birthday--February 18. A fitting connection, since the words that strike me when thinking of their work is love, beauty, art, and courage. The committment to seeing these things as black women, for black women, about black women, is powerful. * In a world where black women are often ignored or erased or othered--not quite woman, or human--Morrison and Lorde both ask us to celebrate the intimacies of black women's experiences. To nurture those nooks and crannies of ourselves that the world often wants to punish us for. There, in the love often denied, the beauty often distorted, the art often misrepresented and commodified, is the source of courage. * * #blackwomen #blackhistorymonth #literature #feminist #blackfeminists #tonimorrison #audrelorde #blacklgbt #birthday #blackwriters #womenwriters
  • 104 8 4 days ago
  • Muriel Smith, as Carmen, in the 1956 revival at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. *
Perhaps it is her mostly London-based career that keeps Smith from being remembered in the same breath as Leontyne Price or Marian Anderson. She moved across the Atlantic in 1949 after a solid career on the stage and airwaves of the US entertainment industry. *
She made her debut as the titular character in the 1943 Broadway debut of Carmen Jones--a far cry from her humble beginnings as a factory worker whose salary supported her studies at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia (where she was also the first African American student). *
In England she became the toast of the theater world through her starring roles in South Pacific and The King and I, as well as her skill as a singer of lieder--a type of German song. Smith was also hired as the singing voice in Hollywood musicals like the film adaptation of The King and I. During the beginnings of the civil rights movement in the US, Smith used her talent to bring to audiences, a musical about the life of Mary McLeod Bethune (which was later adapted for film)*
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#blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #opera #operahistory #theaterhistory #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #carmenjones #1950slondon #broadway #royaloperahouse #operasingers #blackhistorymonth
  • Muriel Smith, as Carmen, in the 1956 revival at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. * Perhaps it is her mostly London-based career that keeps Smith from being remembered in the same breath as Leontyne Price or Marian Anderson. She moved across the Atlantic in 1949 after a solid career on the stage and airwaves of the US entertainment industry. * She made her debut as the titular character in the 1943 Broadway debut of Carmen Jones--a far cry from her humble beginnings as a factory worker whose salary supported her studies at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia (where she was also the first African American student). * In England she became the toast of the theater world through her starring roles in South Pacific and The King and I, as well as her skill as a singer of lieder--a type of German song. Smith was also hired as the singing voice in Hollywood musicals like the film adaptation of The King and I. During the beginnings of the civil rights movement in the US, Smith used her talent to bring to audiences, a musical about the life of Mary McLeod Bethune (which was later adapted for film)* * * #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #opera #operahistory #theaterhistory #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #carmenjones #1950slondon #broadway #royaloperahouse #operasingers #blackhistorymonth
  • 99 2 1 week ago
  • Frederick Douglass is not a black woman, but three things: he was an ardent supporter of women's rights, he chose Valentine's Day as his birthday, and he practically passed the baton of civil rights activism to Ida B. Wells before his death (now, was it honored by the black leaders of the day? That's another story). *
Douglass was also the most photographed man of the 19th century. If that's not an ode to self love--assertion of one's humanity, and a testament of service to the oppressed--I don't know what is! It reminds me of both Beyonce's assertion of herself in the self-titled album and Solange's own artistic experience of sharing A Seat at the Table with us. It also reminds me of the millions of regular people who use Instagram to show themselves to the world, assert their presence, and build a community. *
Selfies, self-titled, art, performance, unapologetically claiming yourself and your image, is a revolutionary act across history.
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So whether you're partnered up, wish you were, or have no interest right now, use Valentine's Day to reflect on the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass and the radical act of taking a picture of yourself.

#frederickdouglass #happybirthday #valentinesday #selfportrait #blackhistorymonth #oldphoto #civilrights #blackactivists #sepia #nineteenthcentury #selffashioning #selfie
  • Frederick Douglass is not a black woman, but three things: he was an ardent supporter of women's rights, he chose Valentine's Day as his birthday, and he practically passed the baton of civil rights activism to Ida B. Wells before his death (now, was it honored by the black leaders of the day? That's another story). * Douglass was also the most photographed man of the 19th century. If that's not an ode to self love--assertion of one's humanity, and a testament of service to the oppressed--I don't know what is! It reminds me of both Beyonce's assertion of herself in the self-titled album and Solange's own artistic experience of sharing A Seat at the Table with us. It also reminds me of the millions of regular people who use Instagram to show themselves to the world, assert their presence, and build a community. * Selfies, self-titled, art, performance, unapologetically claiming yourself and your image, is a revolutionary act across history. * So whether you're partnered up, wish you were, or have no interest right now, use Valentine's Day to reflect on the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass and the radical act of taking a picture of yourself. #frederickdouglass #happybirthday #valentinesday #selfportrait #blackhistorymonth #oldphoto #civilrights #blackactivists #sepia #nineteenthcentury #selffashioning #selfie
  • 99 1 1 week ago
  • The great Hazel Scott playing two pianos in a scene from 1943's The Heat's On. This feat of musical dexterity is astonishing and wonderful, and yet...it speaks to the restrictions that Jim Crow placed on black artists. *
Films made during the Golden Age of Hollywood increasingly featured musical interludes by popular black jazz musicians for the spectacle of their performances. However, spectacle was all that was expected, not marvel over their professional training, and most if not all interludes were filmed to allow Southern movie houses to cut their scenes from the print. However, Scott not only demanded a say in the final cut but she wore her own wardrobe if the studio attempted to dress her in costume she disliked. She was also expected to conform to images of black women's respectability--but as you can see here, her very presence on a stage, on the silver screen, contends with this notion.
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The Trinidadian born Scott, who by now was married to Reverend Adam Clayton Powell Jr, used her talent to fight against segregation and racism. She was the first black woman to have her own television show, until the Red Scare of the 1950s found her blacklisted. She continued her career in Europe until the late 1960s, but continued to be outspoken against racism, segregation, and other oppressions.
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#hazelscott #goldenage #oldhollywood #pianist #blackwomen #musicians #1940s #1940sfashion #1940sfilm #blackpianists #aliciakeys #blackhistorymonth
  • The great Hazel Scott playing two pianos in a scene from 1943's The Heat's On. This feat of musical dexterity is astonishing and wonderful, and yet...it speaks to the restrictions that Jim Crow placed on black artists. * Films made during the Golden Age of Hollywood increasingly featured musical interludes by popular black jazz musicians for the spectacle of their performances. However, spectacle was all that was expected, not marvel over their professional training, and most if not all interludes were filmed to allow Southern movie houses to cut their scenes from the print. However, Scott not only demanded a say in the final cut but she wore her own wardrobe if the studio attempted to dress her in costume she disliked. She was also expected to conform to images of black women's respectability--but as you can see here, her very presence on a stage, on the silver screen, contends with this notion. * The Trinidadian born Scott, who by now was married to Reverend Adam Clayton Powell Jr, used her talent to fight against segregation and racism. She was the first black woman to have her own television show, until the Red Scare of the 1950s found her blacklisted. She continued her career in Europe until the late 1960s, but continued to be outspoken against racism, segregation, and other oppressions. * #hazelscott #goldenage #oldhollywood #pianist #blackwomen #musicians #1940s #1940sfashion #1940sfilm #blackpianists #aliciakeys #blackhistorymonth
  • 236 7 1 week ago
  • Diana Ross performing one of my favorite songs in her catalog--Love Hangover--on Burt Sugarman's The Midnight Special. This was a late night variety show that aired on NBC from 1972-1981. "Love Hangover" was also Diana Ross's fourth number one hit. Hope to hear it tonight at the Grammy's, where Ms. Ross is celebrating her birthday and marvelous career with a special performance!

#1970s #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #dianaross #tvhistory #grammys #disco
  • Diana Ross performing one of my favorite songs in her catalog--Love Hangover--on Burt Sugarman's The Midnight Special. This was a late night variety show that aired on NBC from 1972-1981. "Love Hangover" was also Diana Ross's fourth number one hit. Hope to hear it tonight at the Grammy's, where Ms. Ross is celebrating her birthday and marvelous career with a special performance! #1970s #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackwomen #blacksingers #womensingers #dianaross #tvhistory #grammys #disco
  • 314 16 1 week ago
  • You probably know her as Aunt Viv the Second, but Daphne Maxwell Reid broke barriers as the first black woman chosen as Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University (where she received a degree in architecture and interior design) and as the first black woman on the cover of Glamour Magazine. *
In //Ain't I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race,// Maxine Leeds Craig describes the stakes the Black Power movement placed on beauty pageants for black students at predominantly white colleges in the 1960s. As the headline on this issue of JET magazine states, Reid was one of many black women who won their crown on white campuses. To win was not only an achievement in itself, but a fight for integration and against particular beauty standards (though, admittedly, Reid is light-skinned and her hair is straightened--which speaks to the tensions of black representation, particularly when it comes to black women).
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#1960s #blackwomen #blackpower #homecomingqueen #northwestern #beautypageant #beauty #civilrightsmovement #jetmagazine #models #blackhistorymonth #blackfirsts
  • You probably know her as Aunt Viv the Second, but Daphne Maxwell Reid broke barriers as the first black woman chosen as Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University (where she received a degree in architecture and interior design) and as the first black woman on the cover of Glamour Magazine. * In //Ain't I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race,// Maxine Leeds Craig describes the stakes the Black Power movement placed on beauty pageants for black students at predominantly white colleges in the 1960s. As the headline on this issue of JET magazine states, Reid was one of many black women who won their crown on white campuses. To win was not only an achievement in itself, but a fight for integration and against particular beauty standards (though, admittedly, Reid is light-skinned and her hair is straightened--which speaks to the tensions of black representation, particularly when it comes to black women). * #1960s #blackwomen #blackpower #homecomingqueen #northwestern #beautypageant #beauty #civilrightsmovement #jetmagazine #models #blackhistorymonth #blackfirsts
  • 113 1 2 weeks ago
  • Florence Griffith Joyner--aka Flo Jo--in Rome at the 1987 World Championships. She would go on to win three gold medals and one silver at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Korea.
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Flo Jo was known just as much for her speed as for her glamorous outfits and long nails on the track. Long before Serena Williams' catsuits on the tennis courts and the athleisure trend, Flo Jo wore custom made tracksuits of various colors and fabrics, with one bare sinewy leg as a trademark, and long, curved nails painted in eye-catching designs. Before her early death in 1998, she set the trend for colorful, stylish sportswear that marked her blend of strength and beauty.

#1980s #1990s #womenathletes #blackwomen #trackandfield #olympics #olympians #athleisure #sprinters #blackathletes #1988olympics #fashionhistory #blackhistorymonth #nailart
  • Florence Griffith Joyner--aka Flo Jo--in Rome at the 1987 World Championships. She would go on to win three gold medals and one silver at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Korea. * * Flo Jo was known just as much for her speed as for her glamorous outfits and long nails on the track. Long before Serena Williams' catsuits on the tennis courts and the athleisure trend, Flo Jo wore custom made tracksuits of various colors and fabrics, with one bare sinewy leg as a trademark, and long, curved nails painted in eye-catching designs. Before her early death in 1998, she set the trend for colorful, stylish sportswear that marked her blend of strength and beauty. #1980s #1990s #womenathletes #blackwomen #trackandfield #olympics #olympians #athleisure #sprinters #blackathletes #1988olympics #fashionhistory #blackhistorymonth #nailart
  • 320 7 2 weeks ago
  • Florence Mills (1896-1927) - though mostly unknown today, Florence Mills was one of the first black female superstars. *
Mills was born in DC and became famous practically overnight in the 1921 Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake production, Shuffle Along (Josephine Baker was in the chorus). She was also one of the transatlantic celebrities of the Roaring Twenties, and the Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) was one of her biggest fans--some say a brief romantic interest.
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Mills and her contemporaries on both sides of the Atlantic (Ethel Waters, Adelaide Hall, Alberta Hunter, to name a few) found a new freedom in the entertainment industry of the 1920s. For the first time, black women were upheld as glamorous, beautiful, and aspirational. Mills' images were found in the leading ladies magazines of the day, such as Vogue, and on the covers of records and sheet music. Her early death didn't dim her prominence, with fellow entertainers like Duke Ellington composing beautiful music in her memory. (Pictures of the sheet music were taken at the Chicago Cultural Center, where there's an amazing exhibition on black music and theater in the early 20th century)
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#1920s #1920sfashion #blackwomen #roaringtwenties #florencemills #vaudeville #theaterhistory #broadway #harlemrenaissance #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistorymonth #jazz8
  • Florence Mills (1896-1927) - though mostly unknown today, Florence Mills was one of the first black female superstars. * Mills was born in DC and became famous practically overnight in the 1921 Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake production, Shuffle Along (Josephine Baker was in the chorus). She was also one of the transatlantic celebrities of the Roaring Twenties, and the Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) was one of her biggest fans--some say a brief romantic interest. * Mills and her contemporaries on both sides of the Atlantic (Ethel Waters, Adelaide Hall, Alberta Hunter, to name a few) found a new freedom in the entertainment industry of the 1920s. For the first time, black women were upheld as glamorous, beautiful, and aspirational. Mills' images were found in the leading ladies magazines of the day, such as Vogue, and on the covers of records and sheet music. Her early death didn't dim her prominence, with fellow entertainers like Duke Ellington composing beautiful music in her memory. (Pictures of the sheet music were taken at the Chicago Cultural Center, where there's an amazing exhibition on black music and theater in the early 20th century) * #1920s #1920sfashion #blackwomen #roaringtwenties #florencemills #vaudeville #theaterhistory #broadway #harlemrenaissance #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistorymonth #jazz8
  • 108 5 2 weeks ago
  • 1000 Women to Honor Rosa Parks’ event in Detroit, MI, 1961. Photo includes (L to R) Ms. Towles, Rosa Parks, Coretta King, Septima Clark, Annelle Ponder
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Rosa Parks wasn't the "tired old lady on the bus" that we are taught in elementary school! Danielle McGuire's *At the Dark End of the Street* reveals Parks' radical activism for civil rights and for black women especially, for whom the threat of sexual violence underpinned the Jim Crow South--no matter how much white supremacist propaganda focused on the dangerous black man threatening the purity of white women. *
This photo, once again, shows that Rosa Parks--like Martin Luther King Jr.--was not a lone, exceptional person: Rosa Parks stood shoulder to shoulder with a network of fellow women activists across the United States. <<Septima Clark was an educator whose contributed to the civil rights movement with literacy schools to help disenfranchised black Southerners understand their rights as citizens. <<Annelle Ponder was also an educator, and a librarian, who led the Citizenship Education Program in Mississippi for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. <<Coretta Scott King was committed to the civil rights movement not as MLK's wife but in her own right. After his assassination, she led the sanitation workers march he had planned (and was the reason for his presence in Memphis), and took up the mantle of the civil rights movement, expanding the focus to LGBT rights, world peace, women's rights, etc.
#rosaparks #civilrightsmovement #activists #blackwomen #1960s #blackhistorymonth #corettascottking #womenactivists #happybirthday #septimaclark #educators #annelleponder
  • 1000 Women to Honor Rosa Parks’ event in Detroit, MI, 1961. Photo includes (L to R) Ms. Towles, Rosa Parks, Coretta King, Septima Clark, Annelle Ponder * * * Rosa Parks wasn't the "tired old lady on the bus" that we are taught in elementary school! Danielle McGuire's *At the Dark End of the Street* reveals Parks' radical activism for civil rights and for black women especially, for whom the threat of sexual violence underpinned the Jim Crow South--no matter how much white supremacist propaganda focused on the dangerous black man threatening the purity of white women. * This photo, once again, shows that Rosa Parks--like Martin Luther King Jr.--was not a lone, exceptional person: Rosa Parks stood shoulder to shoulder with a network of fellow women activists across the United States. <#rosaparks #civilrightsmovement #activists #blackwomen #1960s #blackhistorymonth #corettascottking #womenactivists #happybirthday #septimaclark #educators #annelleponder
  • 99 3 2 weeks ago
  • Supper club songstress Sallie Blair, ca 1950s
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Buried in the back issues of JET and other weekly black magazines are photographs, articles, and gossip columns about the long forgotten black women on the supper/cabaret club circuit. They were neither fish nor fowl--not recognized household names like Billie Holiday nor fully able to crack the bright lights of Hollywood like Lena Horne or Dorothy Dandridge. *
And yet this often modest circuit of uptown nightclubs and downtown bars, or brief moments on television or a booking at a popular resort, also provided a steady career for these household names when the vagaries of the segregated mainstream entertainment industry caused career fluctuations. *
Sallie Blair (née Sara Bolling Hutchins) did well enough to earn a write-up in LIFE magazine in 1957, where the article shared that her career began at 16 in her hometown of Baltimore. Her first venues were strip joints, and she worked her way up to the clubs in Chicago and Los Angeles. Articles in JET, Sepia, et al chronicle some of the signature flourishes she tried, ranging from dying her hair platinum blonde to performing barefoot. She married Rene DeKnight, widower of Ebony Magazine's food editor, in 1964. DeKnight was also a musician, so one can assume it was a mutually beneficial relationship. *
Though mostly unknown today, Blair cut a number of records, and even booked popular TV and radio shows like Ed Sullivan and Walter Winchell in the 1950s and 1960s. I haven't found any proof of this yet, other than a record sleeve in Japanese, touting her international hit "More Than Anything," but her career was--at least for a moment--popular across the globe. So why is she "forgotten"? #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #blackwomen #1960s #torchsinger #nightclub #baltimore #musichistory #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #jazz #cabaret #nightlife #records #archives #sound
  • Supper club songstress Sallie Blair, ca 1950s * * * Buried in the back issues of JET and other weekly black magazines are photographs, articles, and gossip columns about the long forgotten black women on the supper/cabaret club circuit. They were neither fish nor fowl--not recognized household names like Billie Holiday nor fully able to crack the bright lights of Hollywood like Lena Horne or Dorothy Dandridge. * And yet this often modest circuit of uptown nightclubs and downtown bars, or brief moments on television or a booking at a popular resort, also provided a steady career for these household names when the vagaries of the segregated mainstream entertainment industry caused career fluctuations. * Sallie Blair (née Sara Bolling Hutchins) did well enough to earn a write-up in LIFE magazine in 1957, where the article shared that her career began at 16 in her hometown of Baltimore. Her first venues were strip joints, and she worked her way up to the clubs in Chicago and Los Angeles. Articles in JET, Sepia, et al chronicle some of the signature flourishes she tried, ranging from dying her hair platinum blonde to performing barefoot. She married Rene DeKnight, widower of Ebony Magazine's food editor, in 1964. DeKnight was also a musician, so one can assume it was a mutually beneficial relationship. * Though mostly unknown today, Blair cut a number of records, and even booked popular TV and radio shows like Ed Sullivan and Walter Winchell in the 1950s and 1960s. I haven't found any proof of this yet, other than a record sleeve in Japanese, touting her international hit "More Than Anything," but her career was--at least for a moment--popular across the globe. So why is she "forgotten"? #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #blackwomen #1960s #torchsinger #nightclub #baltimore #musichistory #blacksingers #womensingers #blackhistory #jazz #cabaret #nightlife #records #archives #sound
  • 144 4 2 weeks ago
  • Leontyne Price, in front of her portrait by Bradley Phillips, 1967
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Price began her career as a singer in the churches of her hometown in Mississippi. By the time she graduated from Juilliard in the mid-1950s, her powerful soprano voice took her from student productions to a European tour for a revival of Gershwin's Porgy and Bess. She built her career in appearances across the US and Europe for the rest of the 1950s and 60s, where she became first African American to sing lead in Milan's Teatro alla Scala. She soon became a star of the Metropolitan Opera, where she moved beyond the typical repertoire for black opera singers (namely, Aïda) to play the prima donna roles that had nominally been considered for white sopranos only. *
The video is Leontyne Price singing "O patria mia" from Aïda in a Canadian television broadcast in 1958.

#opera #soprano #1950s #blackwomen #blacksingers #aida #blackoperasingers #metropolitanopera #1950stelevision #earlyTV #leontyneprice #blackhistory
  • Leontyne Price, in front of her portrait by Bradley Phillips, 1967 * * Price began her career as a singer in the churches of her hometown in Mississippi. By the time she graduated from Juilliard in the mid-1950s, her powerful soprano voice took her from student productions to a European tour for a revival of Gershwin's Porgy and Bess. She built her career in appearances across the US and Europe for the rest of the 1950s and 60s, where she became first African American to sing lead in Milan's Teatro alla Scala. She soon became a star of the Metropolitan Opera, where she moved beyond the typical repertoire for black opera singers (namely, Aïda) to play the prima donna roles that had nominally been considered for white sopranos only. * The video is Leontyne Price singing "O patria mia" from Aïda in a Canadian television broadcast in 1958. #opera #soprano #1950s #blackwomen #blacksingers #aida #blackoperasingers #metropolitanopera #1950stelevision #earlytv #leontyneprice #blackhistory
  • 128 3 3 weeks ago
  • Mary Parks Washington, 1946
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Mary Parks Washington is a visual artist who mixes documents and art to form, according to archivist Krystal Appiah, a "histcollage." This portrait was taken at the Black Mountain College Summer Art Institute in North Carolina. This integrated institution brought together art students of different backgrounds and a number of renowned artists of the day.
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Washington, a graduate of Spelman College, was also the recipient of a college scholarship scheme so bizarre, it would be amusing if it didn't reflect the times. The state of Georgia was so unwilling to desegregate its public universities that it paid Washington's tuition to study art at the University of Mexico! Her papers are held at Archives Division at Auburn Avenue Research Library in Georgia. She currently resides in the Bay Area, where she and her family settled in the 1950s.
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#1940s #1940sfashion #blackwomen #artists #womenartists #hbcugrad #spelmancollege #blackartists #arthistory #georgiaartist #california #blackcalifornia
  • Mary Parks Washington, 1946 * * * Mary Parks Washington is a visual artist who mixes documents and art to form, according to archivist Krystal Appiah, a "histcollage." This portrait was taken at the Black Mountain College Summer Art Institute in North Carolina. This integrated institution brought together art students of different backgrounds and a number of renowned artists of the day. * Washington, a graduate of Spelman College, was also the recipient of a college scholarship scheme so bizarre, it would be amusing if it didn't reflect the times. The state of Georgia was so unwilling to desegregate its public universities that it paid Washington's tuition to study art at the University of Mexico! Her papers are held at Archives Division at Auburn Avenue Research Library in Georgia. She currently resides in the Bay Area, where she and her family settled in the 1950s. * #1940s #1940sfashion #blackwomen #artists #womenartists #hbcugrad #spelmancollege #blackartists #arthistory #georgiaartist #california #blackcalifornia
  • 99 2 3 weeks ago
  • Model Charlene Dash, in red pinstripe suit and a cream beret, ca 1970s. Dash was one of the first mainstream black models in the late 1960s, and was seen in Vogue, Avon and Neiman Marcus advertisements, and other high profile editorials. *
Dash was also one of the eleven dazzling black models who appeared on the American side of "The Battle of Versailles" of 1973, wherein French and American fashion designers went toe to toe over which country had the best designers (read more about this historic event in Robin Givhan's The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History).
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#1970s #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackwomen #model #fashionindustry #battleofversailles #editorial #blackmodels #pinstripes #beret #charlenedash #fashionhistory
  • Model Charlene Dash, in red pinstripe suit and a cream beret, ca 1970s. Dash was one of the first mainstream black models in the late 1960s, and was seen in Vogue, Avon and Neiman Marcus advertisements, and other high profile editorials. * Dash was also one of the eleven dazzling black models who appeared on the American side of "The Battle of Versailles" of 1973, wherein French and American fashion designers went toe to toe over which country had the best designers (read more about this historic event in Robin Givhan's The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History). * #1970s #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackwomen #model #fashionindustry #battleofversailles #editorial #blackmodels #pinstripes #beret #charlenedash #fashionhistory
  • 129 1 3 weeks ago
  • Diahann Carroll looking fabulous--and warm--over the years. *
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The recent Chicago Tribune article on the legacy of black women passing down furs forms a visual and cultural rhetoric to fur. My late paternal grandmother used to brag about what she had in her closet, which would eventually be mine when I was older. Unfortunately, lots of drama occured between then and her passing, so her possessions were dispersed to parts and persons unknown. Despite this, I do remember how special I felt being shown these lovely tippets and muffs and coats, how soft and silky they were, and the scent of her familiar perfume that wafted from the depths of the closet in which they were stored.
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#diahanncarroll #blackwomen #furcoats #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackactress #glamour #luxe #dynasty  #dominiquedevereux #vintage #vintagefashion
  • Diahann Carroll looking fabulous--and warm--over the years. * * * The recent Chicago Tribune article on the legacy of black women passing down furs forms a visual and cultural rhetoric to fur. My late paternal grandmother used to brag about what she had in her closet, which would eventually be mine when I was older. Unfortunately, lots of drama occured between then and her passing, so her possessions were dispersed to parts and persons unknown. Despite this, I do remember how special I felt being shown these lovely tippets and muffs and coats, how soft and silky they were, and the scent of her familiar perfume that wafted from the depths of the closet in which they were stored. * #diahanncarroll #blackwomen #furcoats #1950s #1950sfashion #1950sstyle #1970sfashion #1970shair #blackactress #glamour #luxe #dynasty #dominiquedevereux #vintage #vintagefashion
  • 245 12 3 weeks ago