#weloveparis Instagram Photos & Videos

weloveparis - 62993 posts

Latest Instagram Posts

  • theparisdreamer - Katrina Lawrence @theparisdreamer 5 hours ago
  • #throwbackthursday: I mentioned yesterday that the Jardin des Tuileries was once a palace garden — this is what the Palais des Tuileries used to look like. It stretched along the western edge of the Louvre complex, between the northern and southern wings. The Tuileries was the social centre of Paris when Emperor Napoléon III lived there with his glamorous Empress Eugénie, but it was also a party palace way back in the sixteenth century; Catherine de Medici — who commissioned the building on the site of an old tile factory just beyond the then walls of Paris — held balls here that were so lavish they were known as magnificences. In the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Tuileries was outshone by the newer and glitzier Versailles, but after the Revolution the first Napoléon brought it back to life as the imperial palace, adding the sweet rose-marbled Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel that stands to this day. The palace was destroyed during the 1871 Paris Commune that set fire to much of the city, and seeing this historic building go up in flames must have been as difficult for Parisians then as it was for present-day Parisians to watch Notre-Dame burn. There has been talk of reconstruction over the years, but it’s unlikely that authorities will ever allow the axe historique — the vista that links the Louvre through to the Luxor Obelisk and Arc de Triomphe and beyond — to be interrupted. And there you go: your Instagram history lesson for the day! #throwbackthursday: I mentioned yesterday that the Jardin des Tuileries was once a palace garden — this is what the Palais des Tuileries used to look like. It stretched along the western edge of the Louvre complex, between the northern and southern wings. The Tuileries was the social centre of Paris when Emperor Napoléon III lived there with his glamorous Empress Eugénie, but it was also a party palace way back in the sixteenth century; Catherine de Medici — who commissioned the building on the site of an old tile factory just beyond the then walls of Paris — held balls here that were so lavish they were known as magnificences. In the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Tuileries was outshone by the newer and glitzier Versailles, but after the Revolution the first Napoléon brought it back to life as the imperial palace, adding the sweet rose-marbled Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel that stands to this day. The palace was destroyed during the 1871 Paris Commune that set fire to much of the city, and seeing this historic building go up in flames must have been as difficult for Parisians then as it was for present-day Parisians to watch Notre-Dame burn. There has been talk of reconstruction over the years, but it’s unlikely that authorities will ever allow the axe historique — the vista that links the Louvre through to the Luxor Obelisk and Arc de Triomphe and beyond — to be interrupted. And there you go: your Instagram history lesson for the day!
  • #throwbackthursday: I mentioned yesterday that the Jardin des Tuileries was once a palace garden — this is what the Palais des Tuileries used to look like. It stretched along the western edge of the Louvre complex, between the northern and southern wings. The Tuileries was the social centre of Paris when Emperor Napoléon III lived there with his glamorous Empress Eugénie, but it was also a party palace way back in the sixteenth century; Catherine de Medici — who commissioned the building on the site of an old tile factory just beyond the then walls of Paris — held balls here that were so lavish they were known as magnificences. In the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Tuileries was outshone by the newer and glitzier Versailles, but after the Revolution the first Napoléon brought it back to life as the imperial palace, adding the sweet rose-marbled Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel that stands to this day. The palace was destroyed during the 1871 Paris Commune that set fire to much of the city, and seeing this historic building go up in flames must have been as difficult for Parisians then as it was for present-day Parisians to watch Notre-Dame burn. There has been talk of reconstruction over the years, but it’s unlikely that authorities will ever allow the axe historique — the vista that links the Louvre through to the Luxor Obelisk and Arc de Triomphe and beyond — to be interrupted. And there you go: your Instagram history lesson for the day!
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