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Smith Wigglesworth – English Evangelist – 1859 – 1947

Smith Wigglesworth was as unconventional a preacher as there was. This uneducated former plumber, who, near the time of his conversion could barely read, supplied the early twentieth century Pentecostal movement with a no-nonsense, high energy shot in the arm. Smith, commonly referred to as the “Apostle of Faith,” for his singular focus on the topic of faith in his sermons, was likely the least credentialed of his revivalist counterparts, but possibly the most endued with God’s power! Signs and wonders followed Smith and his ministry, and he earned a reputation for healing the sick, and doing it rather forcefully!

In his services, which were sometimes perceived as odd to passersby, he would break stride with his sermon by suddenly belting out a song in tongues, which he’d then interpret without delay. It was a normal occurrence for the boisterous and unrefined Smith to loudly condemn illnesses with which he was praying out of people, or to sharply rebuke those in attendance who he believed were abusing the gifts of the Spirit. In other instances, Wigglesworth would encourage the formerly sick to run down the aisles of the church to “show” that they believed they were healed. Regardless of his methods, the fruit that followed his ministry was undeniable. Further, those that knew Smith spoke of him as a humble, gentle, and incredibly love-compelled individual.

Smith’s meetings in England, the United States, Australia, and elsewhere were full of healing testimonies. Cancer patients, the wheelchair confined, and those suffering from terminal ailments were restored regularly at these one-of-a-kind church services. Responding to complaints that Smith was sometimes “rough” with people when he prayed for the sick, he said: “You might think by the way I went about praying for the sick that I was sometimes rough, but oh, friends, you have no idea what I see behind the sickness and the one who is afflicted…” His “Ever Increasing Faith” (1924) is a necessary addition to any Christian library. #summerofsaints #pentecost #revival #smithwigglesworth #repost @pccyork ・・・ Smith Wigglesworth – English Evangelist – 1859 – 1947 Smith Wigglesworth was as unconventional a preacher as there was. This uneducated former plumber, who, near the time of his conversion could barely read, supplied the early twentieth century Pentecostal movement with a no-nonsense, high energy shot in the arm. Smith, commonly referred to as the “Apostle of Faith,” for his singular focus on the topic of faith in his sermons, was likely the least credentialed of his revivalist counterparts, but possibly the most endued with God’s power! Signs and wonders followed Smith and his ministry, and he earned a reputation for healing the sick, and doing it rather forcefully! In his services, which were sometimes perceived as odd to passersby, he would break stride with his sermon by suddenly belting out a song in tongues, which he’d then interpret without delay. It was a normal occurrence for the boisterous and unrefined Smith to loudly condemn illnesses with which he was praying out of people, or to sharply rebuke those in attendance who he believed were abusing the gifts of the Spirit. In other instances, Wigglesworth would encourage the formerly sick to run down the aisles of the church to “show” that they believed they were healed. Regardless of his methods, the fruit that followed his ministry was undeniable. Further, those that knew Smith spoke of him as a humble, gentle, and incredibly love-compelled individual. Smith’s meetings in England, the United States, Australia, and elsewhere were full of healing testimonies. Cancer patients, the wheelchair confined, and those suffering from terminal ailments were restored regularly at these one-of-a-kind church services. Responding to complaints that Smith was sometimes “rough” with people when he prayed for the sick, he said: “You might think by the way I went about praying for the sick that I was sometimes rough, but oh, friends, you have no idea what I see behind the sickness and the one who is afflicted…” His “Ever Increasing Faith” (1924) is a necessary addition to any Christian library. #summerofsaints #pentecost #revival #smithwigglesworth
  • #repost @pccyork ・・・ Smith Wigglesworth – English Evangelist – 1859 – 1947 Smith Wigglesworth was as unconventional a preacher as there was. This uneducated former plumber, who, near the time of his conversion could barely read, supplied the early twentieth century Pentecostal movement with a no-nonsense, high energy shot in the arm. Smith, commonly referred to as the “Apostle of Faith,” for his singular focus on the topic of faith in his sermons, was likely the least credentialed of his revivalist counterparts, but possibly the most endued with God’s power! Signs and wonders followed Smith and his ministry, and he earned a reputation for healing the sick, and doing it rather forcefully! In his services, which were sometimes perceived as odd to passersby, he would break stride with his sermon by suddenly belting out a song in tongues, which he’d then interpret without delay. It was a normal occurrence for the boisterous and unrefined Smith to loudly condemn illnesses with which he was praying out of people, or to sharply rebuke those in attendance who he believed were abusing the gifts of the Spirit. In other instances, Wigglesworth would encourage the formerly sick to run down the aisles of the church to “show” that they believed they were healed. Regardless of his methods, the fruit that followed his ministry was undeniable. Further, those that knew Smith spoke of him as a humble, gentle, and incredibly love-compelled individual. Smith’s meetings in England, the United States, Australia, and elsewhere were full of healing testimonies. Cancer patients, the wheelchair confined, and those suffering from terminal ailments were restored regularly at these one-of-a-kind church services. Responding to complaints that Smith was sometimes “rough” with people when he prayed for the sick, he said: “You might think by the way I went about praying for the sick that I was sometimes rough, but oh, friends, you have no idea what I see behind the sickness and the one who is afflicted…” His “Ever Increasing Faith” (1924) is a necessary addition to any Christian library. #summerofsaints #pentecost #revival #smithwigglesworth
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