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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 23 hours ago
  • 📚Our June 2019 Newsletter is out! Read for Tricia Herman's #bookreview on "Black Notes," edited by Dr. Althea Prince; @imbobswaget's interview with Dr. Prince; new & bestselling titles at @adfrntbooklist & a link to Hon. Dr. Robert Bernal's presentation (Apr 4) on his book "Dragon in the Caribbean. You may access it through A Different Booklist's Facebook or Twitter pages or the URL: 
https://t.co/UxwGS1HSAS
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The following is an excerpt from the interview - Dr. Althea Prince on why she thinks it is important to make spaces for women's voices, as she has done in the anotholgy that she recently edited, "Black Notes: Young Black Voices": "[M]ainstream culture, mainstream society, does not give priority to women. So women are still, for instance, trying to ensure that there is equal pay for equal work, so it made sense to me to bring voices together that needed to be heard from our community, from our culture in general.
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"We need to hear from women about their experiences, their creative journeys, so Black Notes brought together older and younger women. The contributors include some young girls who are just reaching the age of maturity. The book seeks to bring together the two generations. We have then the viewpoint - not a complete cross-section of those, but as far as I was able – of those women and girls from the African-Canadian community. So the same objectives: the same business of giving equity, giving voice, allowing space for these voices to express their creativity. Some of it is non-fiction, some of it is fiction and some of it is poetry." #ReadDifferently
✊🏿📚 📚Our June 2019 Newsletter is out! Read for Tricia Herman's #bookreview on "Black Notes," edited by Dr. Althea Prince; @imbobswaget's interview with Dr. Prince; new & bestselling titles at @adfrntbooklist & a link to Hon. Dr. Robert Bernal's presentation (Apr 4) on his book "Dragon in the Caribbean. You may access it through A Different Booklist's Facebook or Twitter pages or the URL: https://t.co/UxwGS1HSAS . The following is an excerpt from the interview - Dr. Althea Prince on why she thinks it is important to make spaces for women's voices, as she has done in the anotholgy that she recently edited, "Black Notes: Young Black Voices": "[M]ainstream culture, mainstream society, does not give priority to women. So women are still, for instance, trying to ensure that there is equal pay for equal work, so it made sense to me to bring voices together that needed to be heard from our community, from our culture in general. . "We need to hear from women about their experiences, their creative journeys, so Black Notes brought together older and younger women. The contributors include some young girls who are just reaching the age of maturity. The book seeks to bring together the two generations. We have then the viewpoint - not a complete cross-section of those, but as far as I was able – of those women and girls from the African-Canadian community. So the same objectives: the same business of giving equity, giving voice, allowing space for these voices to express their creativity. Some of it is non-fiction, some of it is fiction and some of it is poetry." #readdifferently ✊🏿📚
  • 📚Our June 2019 Newsletter is out! Read for Tricia Herman's #bookreview on "Black Notes," edited by Dr. Althea Prince; @imbobswaget's interview with Dr. Prince; new & bestselling titles at @adfrntbooklist & a link to Hon. Dr. Robert Bernal's presentation (Apr 4) on his book "Dragon in the Caribbean. You may access it through A Different Booklist's Facebook or Twitter pages or the URL: https://t.co/UxwGS1HSAS . The following is an excerpt from the interview - Dr. Althea Prince on why she thinks it is important to make spaces for women's voices, as she has done in the anotholgy that she recently edited, "Black Notes: Young Black Voices": "[M]ainstream culture, mainstream society, does not give priority to women. So women are still, for instance, trying to ensure that there is equal pay for equal work, so it made sense to me to bring voices together that needed to be heard from our community, from our culture in general. . "We need to hear from women about their experiences, their creative journeys, so Black Notes brought together older and younger women. The contributors include some young girls who are just reaching the age of maturity. The book seeks to bring together the two generations. We have then the viewpoint - not a complete cross-section of those, but as far as I was able – of those women and girls from the African-Canadian community. So the same objectives: the same business of giving equity, giving voice, allowing space for these voices to express their creativity. Some of it is non-fiction, some of it is fiction and some of it is poetry." #readdifferently ✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 1 week ago
  • 📚✊🏿🏳️‍🌈Looking for new #queer #CaribLit? @adfrntbooklist recommends Nicole Dennis-Benn's new novel "Patsy," which officially releases tomorrow!
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Concepción de León (@nytimes), notes from the outset of her latest review that this immigrant story, featuring vivid Jamaican characters, "defies conventions of motherhood and sexuality." Readers meet, in particular, Patsy and her daughter, True, whom Patsy leaves behind in their homeland, Jamaica, to start a new life in America. Both characters tell the story, wrought vividly according to their personal struggles to negotiate and affirm their subversive identities.
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De León includes excerpts of her interview with the author. On the development of the main character, Dennis-Benn elaborates: "As I started writing this immigrant story, I realized that this woman is not here to give back to her family. She’s here to be a new person [....] But in my imagination, I always thought, 'How about if I write a woman who feels that she couldn’t own that motherhood role?' "
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Dennis-Benn discusses too how she first conceived of daughter True: "I wanted to get into the psychology of this person who’s coming of age, coming into their own identity and questioning the abandonment. And also, too, an individual who is gender nonconforming. True doesn’t fit into this box of femininity, of womanhood, but has no guide, no one else who is actually like her."
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One aspect of the authenticity of the characters is the language that they use: Jamaican patois. Dennis-Benn, aware of her privileged position as an academic and published writer chooses to honour her native language and women's stories, which are often silenced: "We’re told in Jamaica not to use patois in public [....] So this was kind of a rebellious act. As an artist, I have that power to say, 'I’m going to put it back into my work to preserve it.' [...] Now, having this privilege to tell our stories, I’m telling the stories of my mother, my grandmother, the women around me and a society that was colonized, where we were taught to hate ourselves and the sound of our own voices."
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#Patsy, by @ndennisbenn, is AVAILABLE NOW at @adfrntbooklist - #ReadDifferently, #ReadProudly!📚 📚✊🏿🏳️‍🌈Looking for new #queer #cariblit? @adfrntbooklist recommends Nicole Dennis-Benn's new novel "Patsy," which officially releases tomorrow! . Concepción de León (@nytimes), notes from the outset of her latest review that this immigrant story, featuring vivid Jamaican characters, "defies conventions of motherhood and sexuality." Readers meet, in particular, Patsy and her daughter, True, whom Patsy leaves behind in their homeland, Jamaica, to start a new life in America. Both characters tell the story, wrought vividly according to their personal struggles to negotiate and affirm their subversive identities. . De León includes excerpts of her interview with the author. On the development of the main character, Dennis-Benn elaborates: "As I started writing this immigrant story, I realized that this woman is not here to give back to her family. She’s here to be a new person [....] But in my imagination, I always thought, 'How about if I write a woman who feels that she couldn’t own that motherhood role?' " . Dennis-Benn discusses too how she first conceived of daughter True: "I wanted to get into the psychology of this person who’s coming of age, coming into their own identity and questioning the abandonment. And also, too, an individual who is gender nonconforming. True doesn’t fit into this box of femininity, of womanhood, but has no guide, no one else who is actually like her." . One aspect of the authenticity of the characters is the language that they use: Jamaican patois. Dennis-Benn, aware of her privileged position as an academic and published writer chooses to honour her native language and women's stories, which are often silenced: "We’re told in Jamaica not to use patois in public [....] So this was kind of a rebellious act. As an artist, I have that power to say, 'I’m going to put it back into my work to preserve it.' [...] Now, having this privilege to tell our stories, I’m telling the stories of my mother, my grandmother, the women around me and a society that was colonized, where we were taught to hate ourselves and the sound of our own voices." . #patsy, by @ndennisbenn, is AVAILABLE NOW at @adfrntbooklist - #readdifferently, #readproudly!📚
  • 📚✊🏿🏳️‍🌈Looking for new #queer #cariblit? @adfrntbooklist recommends Nicole Dennis-Benn's new novel "Patsy," which officially releases tomorrow! . Concepción de León (@nytimes), notes from the outset of her latest review that this immigrant story, featuring vivid Jamaican characters, "defies conventions of motherhood and sexuality." Readers meet, in particular, Patsy and her daughter, True, whom Patsy leaves behind in their homeland, Jamaica, to start a new life in America. Both characters tell the story, wrought vividly according to their personal struggles to negotiate and affirm their subversive identities. . De León includes excerpts of her interview with the author. On the development of the main character, Dennis-Benn elaborates: "As I started writing this immigrant story, I realized that this woman is not here to give back to her family. She’s here to be a new person [....] But in my imagination, I always thought, 'How about if I write a woman who feels that she couldn’t own that motherhood role?' " . Dennis-Benn discusses too how she first conceived of daughter True: "I wanted to get into the psychology of this person who’s coming of age, coming into their own identity and questioning the abandonment. And also, too, an individual who is gender nonconforming. True doesn’t fit into this box of femininity, of womanhood, but has no guide, no one else who is actually like her." . One aspect of the authenticity of the characters is the language that they use: Jamaican patois. Dennis-Benn, aware of her privileged position as an academic and published writer chooses to honour her native language and women's stories, which are often silenced: "We’re told in Jamaica not to use patois in public [....] So this was kind of a rebellious act. As an artist, I have that power to say, 'I’m going to put it back into my work to preserve it.' [...] Now, having this privilege to tell our stories, I’m telling the stories of my mother, my grandmother, the women around me and a society that was colonized, where we were taught to hate ourselves and the sound of our own voices." . #patsy, by @ndennisbenn, is AVAILABLE NOW at @adfrntbooklist - #readdifferently, #readproudly!📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 2 weeks ago
  • 📚🎵#ThursdayThrowback - not far back - to Jan. 22, 2019 when @nadialhohn_author launched "Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter" of the @harperkid's "I Can Read" series. That evening at @adifferentbooklistcc, Nadia, using the call and response technique, sang the African American spiritual "Wade in the Water." She explained that  some spirituals, also referred to as sorrow songs, were a form of code to motivate and assist slaves to escape.
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Nadia Hohn, also an educator and artist, will launch at @adfrntbooklist "A Likkle Miss Lou: How Jamaican Louise Bennett Coverly Found Her Voice," on Sept. 14 at 2PM. We invite you to join Nadia and @adfrntbooklist for this special occasion, the Toronto launch of Nadia's fifth book, on Jamaican cultural icon, poet Miss Lou.
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Copies of "Harriet Tubman:  Freedom Fighter," (2019, @harperkid) and "Malaika's Costume" (2016, @groundwoodbooks) are available now @adfrntbooklist - #ReadDifferently!
📸: G.R.✊🏿📚 📚🎵#thursdaythrowback - not far back - to Jan. 22, 2019 when @nadialhohn_author launched "Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter" of the @harperkid's "I Can Read" series. That evening at @adifferentbooklistcc, Nadia, using the call and response technique, sang the African American spiritual "Wade in the Water." She explained that some spirituals, also referred to as sorrow songs, were a form of code to motivate and assist slaves to escape. . Nadia Hohn, also an educator and artist, will launch at @adfrntbooklist "A Likkle Miss Lou: How Jamaican Louise Bennett Coverly Found Her Voice," on Sept. 14 at 2PM. We invite you to join Nadia and @adfrntbooklist for this special occasion, the Toronto launch of Nadia's fifth book, on Jamaican cultural icon, poet Miss Lou. . Copies of "Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter," (2019, @harperkid) and "Malaika's Costume" (2016, @groundwoodbooks) are available now @adfrntbooklist - #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
  • 📚🎵#thursdaythrowback - not far back - to Jan. 22, 2019 when @nadialhohn_author launched "Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter" of the @harperkid's "I Can Read" series. That evening at @adifferentbooklistcc, Nadia, using the call and response technique, sang the African American spiritual "Wade in the Water." She explained that some spirituals, also referred to as sorrow songs, were a form of code to motivate and assist slaves to escape. . Nadia Hohn, also an educator and artist, will launch at @adfrntbooklist "A Likkle Miss Lou: How Jamaican Louise Bennett Coverly Found Her Voice," on Sept. 14 at 2PM. We invite you to join Nadia and @adfrntbooklist for this special occasion, the Toronto launch of Nadia's fifth book, on Jamaican cultural icon, poet Miss Lou. . Copies of "Harriet Tubman: Freedom Fighter," (2019, @harperkid) and "Malaika's Costume" (2016, @groundwoodbooks) are available now @adfrntbooklist - #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 1 month ago
  • 📚🎉A huge jazz fan, @kwamealexander decided that he & muscial guest @randyprestonmusic would pay homage to jazz: "We're gonna do a complete riff. I'm gonna ask each one of you why you're here tonight & we're gonna tie a presentation around that." And that's how the launch party for Kwame Alexander & Kadir Nelson's new #picturebook #TheUndefeated unfolded last night at @adifferentbooklistcc.
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It was a launch like no other at @adfrntbooklist. It was storytelling at its finest. Congratulations, Kwame on the publication of your latest work #TheUndefeated! And thank you & Randy for sharing your art with Toronto.
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All who attended and contributed your stories, thank you for making the launch party for #TheUndefeated an unforgettable evening of literature and music. ICYMI enjoy the highlights (swipe left) - copies of the new #picturebook #Undefeated are available at A Different Booklist - #ReadDifferently!
📸: G.R.✊🏿📚 📚🎉A huge jazz fan, @kwamealexander decided that he & muscial guest @randyprestonmusic would pay homage to jazz: "We're gonna do a complete riff. I'm gonna ask each one of you why you're here tonight & we're gonna tie a presentation around that." And that's how the launch party for Kwame Alexander & Kadir Nelson's new #picturebook #theundefeated unfolded last night at @adifferentbooklistcc. . It was a launch like no other at @adfrntbooklist. It was storytelling at its finest. Congratulations, Kwame on the publication of your latest work #theundefeated! And thank you & Randy for sharing your art with Toronto. . All who attended and contributed your stories, thank you for making the launch party for #theundefeated an unforgettable evening of literature and music. ICYMI enjoy the highlights (swipe left) - copies of the new #picturebook #undefeated are available at A Different Booklist - #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
  • 📚🎉A huge jazz fan, @kwamealexander decided that he & muscial guest @randyprestonmusic would pay homage to jazz: "We're gonna do a complete riff. I'm gonna ask each one of you why you're here tonight & we're gonna tie a presentation around that." And that's how the launch party for Kwame Alexander & Kadir Nelson's new #picturebook #theundefeated unfolded last night at @adifferentbooklistcc. . It was a launch like no other at @adfrntbooklist. It was storytelling at its finest. Congratulations, Kwame on the publication of your latest work #theundefeated! And thank you & Randy for sharing your art with Toronto. . All who attended and contributed your stories, thank you for making the launch party for #theundefeated an unforgettable evening of literature and music. ICYMI enjoy the highlights (swipe left) - copies of the new #picturebook #undefeated are available at A Different Booklist - #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 1 month ago
  • 📚Valarie (of @adifferentbooklistcc) with @by_teresawong's new #graphicmemoir "Dear Scarlet" (2019, @arsenalpulp).
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The form of the epistolary memoir is very much alive, as @tanehisipcoates's "Between the World and Me" and David Chariandy's 2018 "I've Been Meaning to Tell You: A Letter to My Daughter" attest. But #DearScarlet expands the possibilities of the form by contributing the graphic dimension and a special focus on women's experiences. Written as a letter to her children about her experience with postpartum depression, #DearScarlet is a work that Wong hopes will encourage women who have experienced #PPD to speak openly about the illness and to seek help without feeling shame and guilt.
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In her recent review of #DearScarlet, @scartercash (@thetorontostar) offers some background to those experiences that inspired Wong to write the book and details on the creative process. Carter writes: "When Teresa Wong was pregnant with her third child, Isaac, memories of the postpartum depression she experienced after the birth of her oldest daughter, Scarlet, came flooding back. Wong would lie in bed crying, anticipating the emotional anguish and the anxieties that lay ahead. She had been through treatment and counselling, and was aware that her pregnancy hormones were in overdrive, but that was of little comfort. She came to the conclusion that the only way to work out her feelings was to write them down.
.
[....]
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“ 'It was a really silent time in my life,' Wong says. 'Taking care of a baby at home by yourself, it’s pretty quiet.'
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"But silence didn’t mean uncomplicated. Wong’s spare ink drawings capture her depression and fear over not bonding with her baby, the physical pain, and the pressures she felt to be a perfect mommy. She uses large swaths of black and plays with perspective to give a visual sense of her imprisonment.
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“ 'There are other great works out there that express what postpartum feels like with lots of words, but I knew I couldn’t do that,' Wong says. 'The graphic-memoir format gave me the freedom to show what I was feeling with minimal words.'
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#DearScarlet is $19.95, and is available now at @adfrntbooklist - #ReadDifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚 📚Valarie (of @adifferentbooklistcc) with @by_teresawong's new #graphicmemoir "Dear Scarlet" (2019, @arsenalpulp). . The form of the epistolary memoir is very much alive, as @tanehisipcoates's "Between the World and Me" and David Chariandy's 2018 "I've Been Meaning to Tell You: A Letter to My Daughter" attest. But #dearscarlet expands the possibilities of the form by contributing the graphic dimension and a special focus on women's experiences. Written as a letter to her children about her experience with postpartum depression, #dearscarlet is a work that Wong hopes will encourage women who have experienced #ppd to speak openly about the illness and to seek help without feeling shame and guilt. . In her recent review of #dearscarlet, @scartercash (@thetorontostar) offers some background to those experiences that inspired Wong to write the book and details on the creative process. Carter writes: "When Teresa Wong was pregnant with her third child, Isaac, memories of the postpartum depression she experienced after the birth of her oldest daughter, Scarlet, came flooding back. Wong would lie in bed crying, anticipating the emotional anguish and the anxieties that lay ahead. She had been through treatment and counselling, and was aware that her pregnancy hormones were in overdrive, but that was of little comfort. She came to the conclusion that the only way to work out her feelings was to write them down. . [....] . “ 'It was a really silent time in my life,' Wong says. 'Taking care of a baby at home by yourself, it’s pretty quiet.' . "But silence didn’t mean uncomplicated. Wong’s spare ink drawings capture her depression and fear over not bonding with her baby, the physical pain, and the pressures she felt to be a perfect mommy. She uses large swaths of black and plays with perspective to give a visual sense of her imprisonment. . “ 'There are other great works out there that express what postpartum feels like with lots of words, but I knew I couldn’t do that,' Wong says. 'The graphic-memoir format gave me the freedom to show what I was feeling with minimal words.' . #dearscarlet is $19.95, and is available now at @adfrntbooklist - #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
  • 📚Valarie (of @adifferentbooklistcc) with @by_teresawong's new #graphicmemoir "Dear Scarlet" (2019, @arsenalpulp). . The form of the epistolary memoir is very much alive, as @tanehisipcoates's "Between the World and Me" and David Chariandy's 2018 "I've Been Meaning to Tell You: A Letter to My Daughter" attest. But #dearscarlet expands the possibilities of the form by contributing the graphic dimension and a special focus on women's experiences. Written as a letter to her children about her experience with postpartum depression, #dearscarlet is a work that Wong hopes will encourage women who have experienced #ppd to speak openly about the illness and to seek help without feeling shame and guilt. . In her recent review of #dearscarlet, @scartercash (@thetorontostar) offers some background to those experiences that inspired Wong to write the book and details on the creative process. Carter writes: "When Teresa Wong was pregnant with her third child, Isaac, memories of the postpartum depression she experienced after the birth of her oldest daughter, Scarlet, came flooding back. Wong would lie in bed crying, anticipating the emotional anguish and the anxieties that lay ahead. She had been through treatment and counselling, and was aware that her pregnancy hormones were in overdrive, but that was of little comfort. She came to the conclusion that the only way to work out her feelings was to write them down. . [....] . “ 'It was a really silent time in my life,' Wong says. 'Taking care of a baby at home by yourself, it’s pretty quiet.' . "But silence didn’t mean uncomplicated. Wong’s spare ink drawings capture her depression and fear over not bonding with her baby, the physical pain, and the pressures she felt to be a perfect mommy. She uses large swaths of black and plays with perspective to give a visual sense of her imprisonment. . “ 'There are other great works out there that express what postpartum feels like with lots of words, but I knew I couldn’t do that,' Wong says. 'The graphic-memoir format gave me the freedom to show what I was feeling with minimal words.' . #dearscarlet is $19.95, and is available now at @adfrntbooklist - #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 2 months ago
  • 📚Salman Rushdie on new #AfricanLiterature by women and on, specifically, #debutnovel "The Old Drift," by Namwali Serpell: "Something is happening in African literature: The women are coming. For decades now, a river of original and important writing by female authors has been flowing out of that continent — books by writers such as Marlene van Niekerk, of whose second novel Liesl Schillinger wrote in these pages, 'books like "Agaat" … are the reason people read novels'; Tsitsi Dangarembga ('Nervous Conditions'); and, of course, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Now that river has burst its banks and become a flood. Namwali Serpell’s extraordinary, ambitious, evocative first novel, 'The Old Drift,' contributes powerfully to this new wave.
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[....]
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"Serpell’s novel is a multigenerational exploration of Zambia’s past, present and even its near future [....]
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" 'The Old Drift,' too, incorporates elements of fabulism into the history of Zambia, and, again, sees that history mostly through women’s eyes [....] "The novel tells the intertwined stories of three families — one white, one black and one the product of an interracial marriage — making jumps in time to tell the various dynastic tales until the three clans merge into one near the end.
.
[....]
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"The novel’s greatest strength lies in its creation of three unforgettable female characters [....]
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"Around these three iconic characters is woven a complex narrative of the founding and growth of Zambia, and, in the book’s second half, of the arrival of and battle against what is referred to only as 'The Virus' — the H.I.V./AIDS pandemic, which, by the year 2000, affected more than 15 percent of the Zambian population, more than half of the afflicted being women. [....]
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“ 'The Old Drift' is an impressive book [....] It isn’t perfect. [...] Sometimes the history, the medical information and the science are laid on with too heavy a hand. But these imperfections should not detract from what is, by any standard, dazzling debut.
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Copies of Serpell's "The Old Drift" (2019, @hogarthbooks) are on order and will be available soon at @adfrntbooklist, so you can #ReadDifferently!✊🏿📚 📚Salman Rushdie on new #africanliterature by women and on, specifically, #debutnovel "The Old Drift," by Namwali Serpell: "Something is happening in African literature: The women are coming. For decades now, a river of original and important writing by female authors has been flowing out of that continent — books by writers such as Marlene van Niekerk, of whose second novel Liesl Schillinger wrote in these pages, 'books like "Agaat" … are the reason people read novels'; Tsitsi Dangarembga ('Nervous Conditions'); and, of course, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Now that river has burst its banks and become a flood. Namwali Serpell’s extraordinary, ambitious, evocative first novel, 'The Old Drift,' contributes powerfully to this new wave. . [....] . "Serpell’s novel is a multigenerational exploration of Zambia’s past, present and even its near future [....] . " 'The Old Drift,' too, incorporates elements of fabulism into the history of Zambia, and, again, sees that history mostly through women’s eyes [....] "The novel tells the intertwined stories of three families — one white, one black and one the product of an interracial marriage — making jumps in time to tell the various dynastic tales until the three clans merge into one near the end. . [....] . "The novel’s greatest strength lies in its creation of three unforgettable female characters [....] . "Around these three iconic characters is woven a complex narrative of the founding and growth of Zambia, and, in the book’s second half, of the arrival of and battle against what is referred to only as 'The Virus' — the H.I.V./AIDS pandemic, which, by the year 2000, affected more than 15 percent of the Zambian population, more than half of the afflicted being women. [....] . “ 'The Old Drift' is an impressive book [....] It isn’t perfect. [...] Sometimes the history, the medical information and the science are laid on with too heavy a hand. But these imperfections should not detract from what is, by any standard, dazzling debut. . Copies of Serpell's "The Old Drift" (2019, @hogarthbooks) are on order and will be available soon at @adfrntbooklist, so you can #readdifferently!✊🏿📚
  • 📚Salman Rushdie on new #africanliterature by women and on, specifically, #debutnovel "The Old Drift," by Namwali Serpell: "Something is happening in African literature: The women are coming. For decades now, a river of original and important writing by female authors has been flowing out of that continent — books by writers such as Marlene van Niekerk, of whose second novel Liesl Schillinger wrote in these pages, 'books like "Agaat" … are the reason people read novels'; Tsitsi Dangarembga ('Nervous Conditions'); and, of course, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Now that river has burst its banks and become a flood. Namwali Serpell’s extraordinary, ambitious, evocative first novel, 'The Old Drift,' contributes powerfully to this new wave. . [....] . "Serpell’s novel is a multigenerational exploration of Zambia’s past, present and even its near future [....] . " 'The Old Drift,' too, incorporates elements of fabulism into the history of Zambia, and, again, sees that history mostly through women’s eyes [....] "The novel tells the intertwined stories of three families — one white, one black and one the product of an interracial marriage — making jumps in time to tell the various dynastic tales until the three clans merge into one near the end. . [....] . "The novel’s greatest strength lies in its creation of three unforgettable female characters [....] . "Around these three iconic characters is woven a complex narrative of the founding and growth of Zambia, and, in the book’s second half, of the arrival of and battle against what is referred to only as 'The Virus' — the H.I.V./AIDS pandemic, which, by the year 2000, affected more than 15 percent of the Zambian population, more than half of the afflicted being women. [....] . “ 'The Old Drift' is an impressive book [....] It isn’t perfect. [...] Sometimes the history, the medical information and the science are laid on with too heavy a hand. But these imperfections should not detract from what is, by any standard, dazzling debut. . Copies of Serpell's "The Old Drift" (2019, @hogarthbooks) are on order and will be available soon at @adfrntbooklist, so you can #readdifferently!✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 2 months ago
  • 📚"We’re told we have to look good at all times and not show any weakness or uncertainty, and I don’t think that is the way we need to move forward," emerging Indigenous writer Alicia Elliott (@ellialic) tells @scartercash (@thetorontostar) in a recent interview centring on Elliott's debut work, "A Mind Spread Out on the Ground." "Sometimes that means sharing moments people think you should be ashamed of. Owning that and not being ashamed and saying, ‘This is who I am. This happened to me and I’ve learned from this, or I’m still recovering from this.’ Being OK sharing that creates so much more of a meaningful connection.”
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Can't wait to delve into this new collection - what does a mind like this have to say about pressing issues in Canada today? About racism, about the effects of colonialism on Indigenous peoples - the specific case of Colten Boushie's murder (see essay "Dark Matters")? As Carter explains in her review, Alicia Elliott's thought is shaped by her Haudenosaunee roots: "At some point while writing, Elliott realized she was integrating Haudenosaunee philosophy and its influence on her world view into her work. 'It’s the idea of seven generations and whatever action you do is going to impact seven generations into the future, and that things that are happening to you now are the result of decisions made seven generations in the past,' she says. 'I always want to contextualize my personal experience inside of different histories of colonialism, racism, sexism and all of these kinds of systems that are operating all the time. It’s like an inheritance we carry with us.”
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And what does a mind like this have to say about addressing such issues at a personal level when they uniquely affect individuals? To find out, pick up a copy of Alicia Elliott's "A Mind Spread Out on the Ground" (2019, @doubledayca) - just launched (at the Gladstone Hotel on Mar. 25) -  at A Different Booklist. And #ReadDifferently!
📸: G.R.✊🏿📚 📚"We’re told we have to look good at all times and not show any weakness or uncertainty, and I don’t think that is the way we need to move forward," emerging Indigenous writer Alicia Elliott (@ellialic) tells @scartercash (@thetorontostar) in a recent interview centring on Elliott's debut work, "A Mind Spread Out on the Ground." "Sometimes that means sharing moments people think you should be ashamed of. Owning that and not being ashamed and saying, ‘This is who I am. This happened to me and I’ve learned from this, or I’m still recovering from this.’ Being OK sharing that creates so much more of a meaningful connection.” . Can't wait to delve into this new collection - what does a mind like this have to say about pressing issues in Canada today? About racism, about the effects of colonialism on Indigenous peoples - the specific case of Colten Boushie's murder (see essay "Dark Matters")? As Carter explains in her review, Alicia Elliott's thought is shaped by her Haudenosaunee roots: "At some point while writing, Elliott realized she was integrating Haudenosaunee philosophy and its influence on her world view into her work. 'It’s the idea of seven generations and whatever action you do is going to impact seven generations into the future, and that things that are happening to you now are the result of decisions made seven generations in the past,' she says. 'I always want to contextualize my personal experience inside of different histories of colonialism, racism, sexism and all of these kinds of systems that are operating all the time. It’s like an inheritance we carry with us.” . And what does a mind like this have to say about addressing such issues at a personal level when they uniquely affect individuals? To find out, pick up a copy of Alicia Elliott's "A Mind Spread Out on the Ground" (2019, @doubledayca) - just launched (at the Gladstone Hotel on Mar. 25) - at A Different Booklist. And #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
  • 📚"We’re told we have to look good at all times and not show any weakness or uncertainty, and I don’t think that is the way we need to move forward," emerging Indigenous writer Alicia Elliott (@ellialic) tells @scartercash (@thetorontostar) in a recent interview centring on Elliott's debut work, "A Mind Spread Out on the Ground." "Sometimes that means sharing moments people think you should be ashamed of. Owning that and not being ashamed and saying, ‘This is who I am. This happened to me and I’ve learned from this, or I’m still recovering from this.’ Being OK sharing that creates so much more of a meaningful connection.” . Can't wait to delve into this new collection - what does a mind like this have to say about pressing issues in Canada today? About racism, about the effects of colonialism on Indigenous peoples - the specific case of Colten Boushie's murder (see essay "Dark Matters")? As Carter explains in her review, Alicia Elliott's thought is shaped by her Haudenosaunee roots: "At some point while writing, Elliott realized she was integrating Haudenosaunee philosophy and its influence on her world view into her work. 'It’s the idea of seven generations and whatever action you do is going to impact seven generations into the future, and that things that are happening to you now are the result of decisions made seven generations in the past,' she says. 'I always want to contextualize my personal experience inside of different histories of colonialism, racism, sexism and all of these kinds of systems that are operating all the time. It’s like an inheritance we carry with us.” . And what does a mind like this have to say about addressing such issues at a personal level when they uniquely affect individuals? To find out, pick up a copy of Alicia Elliott's "A Mind Spread Out on the Ground" (2019, @doubledayca) - just launched (at the Gladstone Hotel on Mar. 25) - at A Different Booklist. And #readdifferently! 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 3 months ago
  • 📚#NewArrival at @adfrntbooklist: #Gingerbread, by Helen Oyeyemi; $24.95 (HC). Excerpt from @alixhawl3y's recent @thetorontostar review of the British writer's 6th novel: "Mother and daughter Margot and Harriet Lee are refugees from Druhástrana, a country that has decided to exit (Drexit?) the rest of the world. They end up in the U.K. among rich family members determined to wring gratitude from them, and eventually flee to London, where Harriet’s own teenage daughter Perdita slips into a coma that takes her to the motherland. When she wakes, they make a deal: 'Perdita will tell Harriet how she got to Druhástrana, and Harriet will tell Perdita how she left it.'
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"The deal doesn’t entirely work out, like many in this book. Druhástrana is a sclerotic bureaucratic place, run by 'theoretical persons.' [....] The parallels with Donald Trump’s America are clear. Wealth wins, and truth is what the powerful make it. The country’s motto is 'Never wounded, never wrong.'
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"The U.K., when the Lees arrive, isn’t much different. Harriet spots falseness everywhere, exclaiming, 'Trickery occurs all the time . . . people spend their life savings on lies.'
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"As painfully real as all of this feels, and though its structure takes some time to sink into, the novel keeps up its weirdly funny momentum. Harriet’s stint as a Gingerbread Girl, shilling faux-nostalgic childhood experiences to Druhástranians, is one of these wincingly hilarious episodes.
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[....]
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"She also has her childhood friend Gretel — yes, that Gretel — for advice. As in the original fairy tale, innocence is corrupted, generations battle it out, and evil doesn’t go down without a fight."
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Written in her trademark style, evident in works like #BoySnowBird & #MrFox, #Gingerbread is "spiked with surprise and delight," Hawley writes. Read complete review here, via The Toronto Star: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thestar.com/amp/entertainment/books/2019/03/01/helen-oyeyemis-gingerbread-recipe-involves-a-fact-free-world.html
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Purchase your copy of Helen Oyeyemi's #Gingerbread at @adfrntbooklist, and #ReadDifferently!
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#HelenOyeyemi #Gingerbread #NewRelease #Fiction #BookReview #AlixHawley
📸: G.R.✊🏿📚 📚#newarrival at @adfrntbooklist: #gingerbread, by Helen Oyeyemi; $24.95 (HC). Excerpt from @alixhawl3y's recent @thetorontostar review of the British writer's 6th novel: "Mother and daughter Margot and Harriet Lee are refugees from Druhástrana, a country that has decided to exit (Drexit?) the rest of the world. They end up in the U.K. among rich family members determined to wring gratitude from them, and eventually flee to London, where Harriet’s own teenage daughter Perdita slips into a coma that takes her to the motherland. When she wakes, they make a deal: 'Perdita will tell Harriet how she got to Druhástrana, and Harriet will tell Perdita how she left it.' . "The deal doesn’t entirely work out, like many in this book. Druhástrana is a sclerotic bureaucratic place, run by 'theoretical persons.' [....] The parallels with Donald Trump’s America are clear. Wealth wins, and truth is what the powerful make it. The country’s motto is 'Never wounded, never wrong.' . "The U.K., when the Lees arrive, isn’t much different. Harriet spots falseness everywhere, exclaiming, 'Trickery occurs all the time . . . people spend their life savings on lies.' . "As painfully real as all of this feels, and though its structure takes some time to sink into, the novel keeps up its weirdly funny momentum. Harriet’s stint as a Gingerbread Girl, shilling faux-nostalgic childhood experiences to Druhástranians, is one of these wincingly hilarious episodes. . [....] . "She also has her childhood friend Gretel — yes, that Gretel — for advice. As in the original fairy tale, innocence is corrupted, generations battle it out, and evil doesn’t go down without a fight." . Written in her trademark style, evident in works like #boysnowbird & #mrfox, #gingerbread is "spiked with surprise and delight," Hawley writes. Read complete review here, via The Toronto Star: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thestar.com/amp/entertainment/books/2019/03/01/helen-oyeyemis-gingerbread-recipe-involves-a-fact-free-world.html . Purchase your copy of Helen Oyeyemi's #gingerbread at @adfrntbooklist, and #readdifferently! . #helenoyeyemi #gingerbread #newrelease #fiction #bookreview #alixhawley 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
  • 📚#newarrival at @adfrntbooklist: #gingerbread, by Helen Oyeyemi; $24.95 (HC). Excerpt from @alixhawl3y's recent @thetorontostar review of the British writer's 6th novel: "Mother and daughter Margot and Harriet Lee are refugees from Druhástrana, a country that has decided to exit (Drexit?) the rest of the world. They end up in the U.K. among rich family members determined to wring gratitude from them, and eventually flee to London, where Harriet’s own teenage daughter Perdita slips into a coma that takes her to the motherland. When she wakes, they make a deal: 'Perdita will tell Harriet how she got to Druhástrana, and Harriet will tell Perdita how she left it.' . "The deal doesn’t entirely work out, like many in this book. Druhástrana is a sclerotic bureaucratic place, run by 'theoretical persons.' [....] The parallels with Donald Trump’s America are clear. Wealth wins, and truth is what the powerful make it. The country’s motto is 'Never wounded, never wrong.' . "The U.K., when the Lees arrive, isn’t much different. Harriet spots falseness everywhere, exclaiming, 'Trickery occurs all the time . . . people spend their life savings on lies.' . "As painfully real as all of this feels, and though its structure takes some time to sink into, the novel keeps up its weirdly funny momentum. Harriet’s stint as a Gingerbread Girl, shilling faux-nostalgic childhood experiences to Druhástranians, is one of these wincingly hilarious episodes. . [....] . "She also has her childhood friend Gretel — yes, that Gretel — for advice. As in the original fairy tale, innocence is corrupted, generations battle it out, and evil doesn’t go down without a fight." . Written in her trademark style, evident in works like #boysnowbird & #mrfox, #gingerbread is "spiked with surprise and delight," Hawley writes. Read complete review here, via The Toronto Star: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thestar.com/amp/entertainment/books/2019/03/01/helen-oyeyemis-gingerbread-recipe-involves-a-fact-free-world.html . Purchase your copy of Helen Oyeyemi's #gingerbread at @adfrntbooklist, and #readdifferently! . #helenoyeyemi #gingerbread #newrelease #fiction #bookreview #alixhawley 📸: G.R.✊🏿📚
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  • adfrntbooklist - A Different Booklist @adfrntbooklist 3 months ago
  • 📚HIGHLIGHTS from last night's "Report by Brother Ameth Lo on the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference in Accra," at @adifferntbooklistcc.
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Two separate #PanAfricanism conferences (60th Anniversary Commemorations of the First All-African People's Conference, Dec. 5-8 + the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference, Dec. 8-13) were held at the end of 2018 in Accra, Ghana. This division in coordination reflects one of the major challenges the movement faces today, fragmentation, scholar Ameth Lo explained yesterday. But, Lo, who attended the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference, noted that the differences are not fundamental. They can be overcome as they are mainly differences related to personality. And the main objective is the same for Pan-Africanists: To establish a political federation that will unite all people of African descent in the continent and the Diaspora across the world. The federation would serve as a tool to address problems of racism, economic domination, security, etc.
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Toronto delegates for both conferences were impressed by the strong presence of youth at conference workshops, which dealt with questions about the structure, strategies, legal framework of the federation.
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Other points raised: Swahili, as a non-ethnic language would be the official language of the federation; to further motivate Pan-Africanists, attention should be on not just the challenges but also victories and triumphs of the movement; and the movement will be strengthened when it controls its own narrative and does not merely respond to the dominant one - consider a narrative that uses the term 'African genocide' and not the euphemistic 'slave trade'. Clearly, we @adifferntbooklistcc were host to a dynamic and clarifying exchange of information and ideas on the current direction of #PanAfricanism.
.
Thank you, Ameth Lo, for generously taking the time to present your meticulous report on the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference 2018 - and to all Toronto delegates who shared your impressions of the conferences. Thank you all who attended to give strength to the movement! #ReadDifferently
📸: G.R.📚 📚HIGHLIGHTS from last night's "Report by Brother Ameth Lo on the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference in Accra," at @adifferntbooklistcc. . Two separate #panafricanism conferences (60th Anniversary Commemorations of the First All-African People's Conference, Dec. 5-8 + the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference, Dec. 8-13) were held at the end of 2018 in Accra, Ghana. This division in coordination reflects one of the major challenges the movement faces today, fragmentation, scholar Ameth Lo explained yesterday. But, Lo, who attended the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference, noted that the differences are not fundamental. They can be overcome as they are mainly differences related to personality. And the main objective is the same for Pan-Africanists: To establish a political federation that will unite all people of African descent in the continent and the Diaspora across the world. The federation would serve as a tool to address problems of racism, economic domination, security, etc. . Toronto delegates for both conferences were impressed by the strong presence of youth at conference workshops, which dealt with questions about the structure, strategies, legal framework of the federation. . Other points raised: Swahili, as a non-ethnic language would be the official language of the federation; to further motivate Pan-Africanists, attention should be on not just the challenges but also victories and triumphs of the movement; and the movement will be strengthened when it controls its own narrative and does not merely respond to the dominant one - consider a narrative that uses the term 'African genocide' and not the euphemistic 'slave trade'. Clearly, we @adifferntbooklistcc were host to a dynamic and clarifying exchange of information and ideas on the current direction of #panafricanism. . Thank you, Ameth Lo, for generously taking the time to present your meticulous report on the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference 2018 - and to all Toronto delegates who shared your impressions of the conferences. Thank you all who attended to give strength to the movement! #readdifferently 📸: G.R.📚
  • 📚HIGHLIGHTS from last night's "Report by Brother Ameth Lo on the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference in Accra," at @adifferntbooklistcc. . Two separate #panafricanism conferences (60th Anniversary Commemorations of the First All-African People's Conference, Dec. 5-8 + the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference, Dec. 8-13) were held at the end of 2018 in Accra, Ghana. This division in coordination reflects one of the major challenges the movement faces today, fragmentation, scholar Ameth Lo explained yesterday. But, Lo, who attended the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference, noted that the differences are not fundamental. They can be overcome as they are mainly differences related to personality. And the main objective is the same for Pan-Africanists: To establish a political federation that will unite all people of African descent in the continent and the Diaspora across the world. The federation would serve as a tool to address problems of racism, economic domination, security, etc. . Toronto delegates for both conferences were impressed by the strong presence of youth at conference workshops, which dealt with questions about the structure, strategies, legal framework of the federation. . Other points raised: Swahili, as a non-ethnic language would be the official language of the federation; to further motivate Pan-Africanists, attention should be on not just the challenges but also victories and triumphs of the movement; and the movement will be strengthened when it controls its own narrative and does not merely respond to the dominant one - consider a narrative that uses the term 'African genocide' and not the euphemistic 'slave trade'. Clearly, we @adifferntbooklistcc were host to a dynamic and clarifying exchange of information and ideas on the current direction of #panafricanism. . Thank you, Ameth Lo, for generously taking the time to present your meticulous report on the Pan-Africanist Federalist Movement's Conference 2018 - and to all Toronto delegates who shared your impressions of the conferences. Thank you all who attended to give strength to the movement! #readdifferently 📸: G.R.📚
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