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  • af.ra.kan - I am AfRaKan @af.ra.kan 27 minutes ago
  • #Repost @the.ankh.life
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The word Church in Greek is Circe, she is the goddess of deception who lured men into her lair and transformed them into pigs. This is the same thing that's done by that which we called the physical Church. The difference is that the latter is done mostly with our consent. In Scottish (Gaelic) the word for church is Kirk, a derivation of Circe. We get the words circus and circle from this goddess name also. Many "holy" cities, shrines and precincts were designed upon the circle. #Auset (#Isis) were the precursors of Circe, as well as another #Goddess named Diana, Circe is the same as #Diana, called in the Greek 'ekklesias' whom you can find your New Testament bible at: "So that not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought; but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana should be despised, and her magnificence should be destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth" (Acts 19:27). "For ye have brought hither these men, which are neither robbers of churches (ekklesias), nor yet blasphemers of your goddess." (Acts 19:37). "Some therefore cried one thing, and some another for the ASSEMBLY (ekklesia) was confused; and the more part knew not why they were come together" (Acts 19:32). This word is used in most English versions as a rendering of the New Testament's Greek word ekklesia. Ekklesia really means "a calling out", a meeting or a gathering. Ekklesia is the #Greek equivalent of the Hebrew qahal, which means an assembly or a congregation. Neither ekklesia nor qahal means a building. Tyndale, in his translation, uniformly translated ekklesia as "congregation" and only used the word "churches" to translate Acts 19:37 for heathen temples! Whence the word "church", then? Ecclesiastical sources give the origin as kuriakon or kyriakon in Greek. However, to accept this one has to stretch their imagination in an attempt to see any resemblance. Also, because kuriakon means a building (the house of Kurios=Lord), and not a gathering or meeting of people, as the words ekklesia and qahal imply, therefore this explanation can only be regarded as distorted, even if it is true. Church is Circe. #repost @the.ankh.life --------------------------------------- The word Church in Greek is Circe, she is the goddess of deception who lured men into her lair and transformed them into pigs. This is the same thing that's done by that which we called the physical Church. The difference is that the latter is done mostly with our consent. In Scottish (Gaelic) the word for church is Kirk, a derivation of Circe. We get the words circus and circle from this goddess name also. Many "holy" cities, shrines and precincts were designed upon the circle. #auset (#isis) were the precursors of Circe, as well as another #goddess named Diana, Circe is the same as #diana, called in the Greek 'ekklesias' whom you can find your New Testament bible at: "So that not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought; but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana should be despised, and her magnificence should be destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth" (Acts 19:27). "For ye have brought hither these men, which are neither robbers of churches (ekklesias), nor yet blasphemers of your goddess." (Acts 19:37). "Some therefore cried one thing, and some another for the ASSEMBLY (ekklesia) was confused; and the more part knew not why they were come together" (Acts 19:32). This word is used in most English versions as a rendering of the New Testament's Greek word ekklesia. Ekklesia really means "a calling out", a meeting or a gathering. Ekklesia is the #greek equivalent of the Hebrew qahal, which means an assembly or a congregation. Neither ekklesia nor qahal means a building. Tyndale, in his translation, uniformly translated ekklesia as "congregation" and only used the word "churches" to translate Acts 19:37 for heathen temples! Whence the word "church", then? Ecclesiastical sources give the origin as kuriakon or kyriakon in Greek. However, to accept this one has to stretch their imagination in an attempt to see any resemblance. Also, because kuriakon means a building (the house of Kurios=Lord), and not a gathering or meeting of people, as the words ekklesia and qahal imply, therefore this explanation can only be regarded as distorted, even if it is true. Church is Circe.
  • #repost @the.ankh.life --------------------------------------- The word Church in Greek is Circe, she is the goddess of deception who lured men into her lair and transformed them into pigs. This is the same thing that's done by that which we called the physical Church. The difference is that the latter is done mostly with our consent. In Scottish (Gaelic) the word for church is Kirk, a derivation of Circe. We get the words circus and circle from this goddess name also. Many "holy" cities, shrines and precincts were designed upon the circle. #auset (#isis) were the precursors of Circe, as well as another #goddess named Diana, Circe is the same as #diana, called in the Greek 'ekklesias' whom you can find your New Testament bible at: "So that not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought; but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana should be despised, and her magnificence should be destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth" (Acts 19:27). "For ye have brought hither these men, which are neither robbers of churches (ekklesias), nor yet blasphemers of your goddess." (Acts 19:37). "Some therefore cried one thing, and some another for the ASSEMBLY (ekklesia) was confused; and the more part knew not why they were come together" (Acts 19:32). This word is used in most English versions as a rendering of the New Testament's Greek word ekklesia. Ekklesia really means "a calling out", a meeting or a gathering. Ekklesia is the #greek equivalent of the Hebrew qahal, which means an assembly or a congregation. Neither ekklesia nor qahal means a building. Tyndale, in his translation, uniformly translated ekklesia as "congregation" and only used the word "churches" to translate Acts 19:37 for heathen temples! Whence the word "church", then? Ecclesiastical sources give the origin as kuriakon or kyriakon in Greek. However, to accept this one has to stretch their imagination in an attempt to see any resemblance. Also, because kuriakon means a building (the house of Kurios=Lord), and not a gathering or meeting of people, as the words ekklesia and qahal imply, therefore this explanation can only be regarded as distorted, even if it is true. Church is Circe.
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