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  • artfullyawear - Ariel Adkins 🎨👗 @artfullyawear 8 minutes ago
  • Guatemala has deepened my love for #wearableart in so many ways. This dress is my newest artwork, created in collaboration with Amalia Tay and her co-op of local women in San Juan La Laguna. They taught me the process of natural dyeing, using indigenous plants found along Lake Atitlán, and we transformed this cotton dress purchased in the market into a color field masterpiece using their centuries-old techniques. 🌾 Many women in the area do not have the opportunity to go to school, but are taught textile work from their mothers and grandmothers. The TinteMaya co-op allows the women to share their skills and gives them a place to sell their work so that they can support their families without a formal education. Taking Amalia’s class (all in Spanish!) gave me so much admiration for the love and diligence Guatemalan women put into their work, and opened my eyes to a side of the culture I never would have appreciated without trying to do it myself. 
The steps we followed were:
1. Gather plants that are used for natural dyeing around the property (Amalia’s home). We used Indigo Maya and Cincha. 
2. Break them into pieces and add the bits to boiling water heated on Amalia’s outdoor cooking stove. 
3. Let the plants boil down until the water changes color, then soak the garment in lake water and slowly submerge it into the boiling pot.
4. Once the desired saturation of color is achieved, rinse the garment in a bath with chopped banana stems, which act as a setting agent for the dye. 
5. Rinse several times with lake water, then repeat the process for each color. 
6. When all colors are complete, hang it out to dry in the sun. 
If you happen to be in Guatemala, in the Lake Atitlán area, I highly recommend connecting with Amalia and her co-op! You can schedule a class by emailing tintemaya@gmail.com for find more information on their Facebook page: TinteMaya. Guatemala has deepened my love for #wearableart in so many ways. This dress is my newest artwork, created in collaboration with Amalia Tay and her co-op of local women in San Juan La Laguna. They taught me the process of natural dyeing, using indigenous plants found along Lake Atitlán, and we transformed this cotton dress purchased in the market into a color field masterpiece using their centuries-old techniques. 🌾 Many women in the area do not have the opportunity to go to school, but are taught textile work from their mothers and grandmothers. The TinteMaya co-op allows the women to share their skills and gives them a place to sell their work so that they can support their families without a formal education. Taking Amalia’s class (all in Spanish!) gave me so much admiration for the love and diligence Guatemalan women put into their work, and opened my eyes to a side of the culture I never would have appreciated without trying to do it myself. The steps we followed were: 1. Gather plants that are used for natural dyeing around the property (Amalia’s home). We used Indigo Maya and Cincha. 2. Break them into pieces and add the bits to boiling water heated on Amalia’s outdoor cooking stove. 3. Let the plants boil down until the water changes color, then soak the garment in lake water and slowly submerge it into the boiling pot. 4. Once the desired saturation of color is achieved, rinse the garment in a bath with chopped banana stems, which act as a setting agent for the dye. 5. Rinse several times with lake water, then repeat the process for each color. 6. When all colors are complete, hang it out to dry in the sun. If you happen to be in Guatemala, in the Lake Atitlán area, I highly recommend connecting with Amalia and her co-op! You can schedule a class by emailing tintemaya@gmail.com for find more information on their Facebook page: TinteMaya.
  • Guatemala has deepened my love for #wearableart in so many ways. This dress is my newest artwork, created in collaboration with Amalia Tay and her co-op of local women in San Juan La Laguna. They taught me the process of natural dyeing, using indigenous plants found along Lake Atitlán, and we transformed this cotton dress purchased in the market into a color field masterpiece using their centuries-old techniques. 🌾 Many women in the area do not have the opportunity to go to school, but are taught textile work from their mothers and grandmothers. The TinteMaya co-op allows the women to share their skills and gives them a place to sell their work so that they can support their families without a formal education. Taking Amalia’s class (all in Spanish!) gave me so much admiration for the love and diligence Guatemalan women put into their work, and opened my eyes to a side of the culture I never would have appreciated without trying to do it myself. The steps we followed were: 1. Gather plants that are used for natural dyeing around the property (Amalia’s home). We used Indigo Maya and Cincha. 2. Break them into pieces and add the bits to boiling water heated on Amalia’s outdoor cooking stove. 3. Let the plants boil down until the water changes color, then soak the garment in lake water and slowly submerge it into the boiling pot. 4. Once the desired saturation of color is achieved, rinse the garment in a bath with chopped banana stems, which act as a setting agent for the dye. 5. Rinse several times with lake water, then repeat the process for each color. 6. When all colors are complete, hang it out to dry in the sun. If you happen to be in Guatemala, in the Lake Atitlán area, I highly recommend connecting with Amalia and her co-op! You can schedule a class by emailing tintemaya@gmail.com for find more information on their Facebook page: TinteMaya.
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