#alphacollective Instagram Photos & Videos

alphacollective - 714684 posts

Latest Instagram Posts

  • wanderingconner - Conner Denessen @wanderingconner 24 minutes ago
  • Hello fine humans of @instagram  I have posted a new blog from my time in Taos NM! Would mean the world to me if you could take a few minutes to read through 😊 Also if your headed that way it may help! The link is in my bio, cheers 🤘🏼
Swipe to see photos of the area 👉🏼 Hello fine humans of @instagram I have posted a new blog from my time in Taos NM! Would mean the world to me if you could take a few minutes to read through 😊 Also if your headed that way it may help! The link is in my bio, cheers 🤘🏼 Swipe to see photos of the area 👉🏼
  • Hello fine humans of @instagram I have posted a new blog from my time in Taos NM! Would mean the world to me if you could take a few minutes to read through 😊 Also if your headed that way it may help! The link is in my bio, cheers 🤘🏼 Swipe to see photos of the area 👉🏼
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  • photo_fitz_ - Nathan Fitzgerald | Colorado @photo_fitz_ 52 minutes ago
  • Swipe left to see Empire Valley - creative edits by @evolving.sky, original photo by me!
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Landscape photographers lament 2 things consistently: (1) how bad their camera’s dynamic range sucks compared to the human eye/brain (2) conveyance of scale. How many times this week have you read a caption that goes like, “no picture could ever do the scale of this scene justice?” The National Park Service could fill the entire Yosemite Valley with nickels if it had one for every time an angsty Instagrammer complained about conveyance of scale in a picture. But did you ever notice that no one complains about problems conveying the scale of buildings in New York City? That’s because your brain can easily process the scale of a building, given that pretty much all buildings are built to the same standards no matter where you go in the world. Rock formations, on the other hand, do not follow building codes. You could put a picture of a 100ft rock next to a 3000ft rock and without something to give it scale, your brain has no idea which one is larger by simply looking at a 2D picture. To solve this problem in Yosemite is no small task: You can either to construct the world’s largest inflatable Empire State Building drone, to provide a familiar icon that wouldn’t permanently damage the Valley floor, or you can have fellow dreamer @evolving.sky dispense an entire 12-pack of Photoshop magic all at once onto a carefully selected photo. After consulting with Andrew on this idea, it became abundantly clear that the Empire State Drone concept was very very bad and the Photoshop dispenser was very very good. In my previous Valley post, I mentioned that the El Cap prominence is 3000ft high, more than double the Empire State Building. Now you can see exactly what that means in a way your brain can process: Empire Valley at sunrise, April 25, 2019 at 7:44am PT.
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Sony a7R iii | Sony 16-35 f2.8 G Master
ISO 100 | 28mm | f13 | 1/640s
3 shot exposure blend from tripod Swipe left to see Empire Valley - creative edits by @evolving.sky, original photo by me! . Landscape photographers lament 2 things consistently: (1) how bad their camera’s dynamic range sucks compared to the human eye/brain (2) conveyance of scale. How many times this week have you read a caption that goes like, “no picture could ever do the scale of this scene justice?” The National Park Service could fill the entire Yosemite Valley with nickels if it had one for every time an angsty Instagrammer complained about conveyance of scale in a picture. But did you ever notice that no one complains about problems conveying the scale of buildings in New York City? That’s because your brain can easily process the scale of a building, given that pretty much all buildings are built to the same standards no matter where you go in the world. Rock formations, on the other hand, do not follow building codes. You could put a picture of a 100ft rock next to a 3000ft rock and without something to give it scale, your brain has no idea which one is larger by simply looking at a 2D picture. To solve this problem in Yosemite is no small task: You can either to construct the world’s largest inflatable Empire State Building drone, to provide a familiar icon that wouldn’t permanently damage the Valley floor, or you can have fellow dreamer @evolving.sky dispense an entire 12-pack of Photoshop magic all at once onto a carefully selected photo. After consulting with Andrew on this idea, it became abundantly clear that the Empire State Drone concept was very very bad and the Photoshop dispenser was very very good. In my previous Valley post, I mentioned that the El Cap prominence is 3000ft high, more than double the Empire State Building. Now you can see exactly what that means in a way your brain can process: Empire Valley at sunrise, April 25, 2019 at 7:44am PT. . Sony a7R iii | Sony 16-35 f2.8 G Master ISO 100 | 28mm | f13 | 1/640s 3 shot exposure blend from tripod
  • Swipe left to see Empire Valley - creative edits by @evolving.sky, original photo by me! . Landscape photographers lament 2 things consistently: (1) how bad their camera’s dynamic range sucks compared to the human eye/brain (2) conveyance of scale. How many times this week have you read a caption that goes like, “no picture could ever do the scale of this scene justice?” The National Park Service could fill the entire Yosemite Valley with nickels if it had one for every time an angsty Instagrammer complained about conveyance of scale in a picture. But did you ever notice that no one complains about problems conveying the scale of buildings in New York City? That’s because your brain can easily process the scale of a building, given that pretty much all buildings are built to the same standards no matter where you go in the world. Rock formations, on the other hand, do not follow building codes. You could put a picture of a 100ft rock next to a 3000ft rock and without something to give it scale, your brain has no idea which one is larger by simply looking at a 2D picture. To solve this problem in Yosemite is no small task: You can either to construct the world’s largest inflatable Empire State Building drone, to provide a familiar icon that wouldn’t permanently damage the Valley floor, or you can have fellow dreamer @evolving.sky dispense an entire 12-pack of Photoshop magic all at once onto a carefully selected photo. After consulting with Andrew on this idea, it became abundantly clear that the Empire State Drone concept was very very bad and the Photoshop dispenser was very very good. In my previous Valley post, I mentioned that the El Cap prominence is 3000ft high, more than double the Empire State Building. Now you can see exactly what that means in a way your brain can process: Empire Valley at sunrise, April 25, 2019 at 7:44am PT. . Sony a7R iii | Sony 16-35 f2.8 G Master ISO 100 | 28mm | f13 | 1/640s 3 shot exposure blend from tripod
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  • livingasgreg - Greg Eimers @livingasgreg 1 hour ago
  • VIBES 🕶 #ONLY
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~ Can’t wait to be back in the Bay! ~
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A very important person taught me something that I met up here while following life’s unexpected path. He told me that all you need to do in life is “follow the vibe”....Thanks for the talk dog 🤙🏻 haven’t stopped following that VIBE. Now here we are, guess we will see what happens 🙏🏻 VIBES 🕶 #only • • ~ Can’t wait to be back in the Bay! ~ • • A very important person taught me something that I met up here while following life’s unexpected path. He told me that all you need to do in life is “follow the vibe”....Thanks for the talk dog 🤙🏻 haven’t stopped following that VIBE. Now here we are, guess we will see what happens 🙏🏻
  • VIBES 🕶 #only • • ~ Can’t wait to be back in the Bay! ~ • • A very important person taught me something that I met up here while following life’s unexpected path. He told me that all you need to do in life is “follow the vibe”....Thanks for the talk dog 🤙🏻 haven’t stopped following that VIBE. Now here we are, guess we will see what happens 🙏🏻
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