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  • painted.verse - Monika Singh @painted.verse 2 days ago
  • I have always had intense admiration for writers who, through their journalistic way of writing, give a lot to think about. Chinua Achebe has taken this admiration to another height. He is easy to read, but difficult to access. He stated things as plainly as he could and leaves the burden of making out the undertones on his readers. To be honest, he leaves a lot on his readers.

Things Fall Apart begins with the protagonist and the reminiscences of his father. Okonkwo is not in awe with his father's way of living and he carves out his own destiny. He is not one of those protagonists who, at first, made a place in my heart. It wasn't until Roshan (@flawed.poetry) rightfully pointed out the reason of his actions being that he was the member of a clan that I finally started taking his course of action in.

I had been too carried away in the beginning because I wanted to know if the misogynistic narration is related to the author. I try to keep the artist away from his/her work as far as possible. But I had recently read Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Introduction to The African Trilogy and what I had been thinking about Joseph Conrad being a racist came back to me yet again. Adichie, recapitulating Achebe's "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness", wrote, "[Conrad] had failed to hold an authorial rejection of that world-view [the racism of the time]". Throughout the work, I was trying to find if Okonkwo's misogyny has an "authorial rejection" and I am glad that I found, at least that's what I think. It was through Uchendu, Okonkwo's mother's younger brother, that Achebe had pacified the fire of supposed misogyny that was seething in me. He said, "It's true that a child belongs to his father. But when a father beats his child, it seeks sympathy in its mother's hut. A man belongs to his father-land when things are good and life is sweet. But when there is sorrow and bitterness he finds refuge in his motherland. Your mother is there to protect you. She is buried there. And that is why we say mother is supreme."
°
Things Fall Apart is not meant just for a light reading, but also for going through its depth and exploring it even in its remotest corner. I have always had intense admiration for writers who, through their journalistic way of writing, give a lot to think about. Chinua Achebe has taken this admiration to another height. He is easy to read, but difficult to access. He stated things as plainly as he could and leaves the burden of making out the undertones on his readers. To be honest, he leaves a lot on his readers. Things Fall Apart begins with the protagonist and the reminiscences of his father. Okonkwo is not in awe with his father's way of living and he carves out his own destiny. He is not one of those protagonists who, at first, made a place in my heart. It wasn't until Roshan (@flawed.poetry) rightfully pointed out the reason of his actions being that he was the member of a clan that I finally started taking his course of action in. I had been too carried away in the beginning because I wanted to know if the misogynistic narration is related to the author. I try to keep the artist away from his/her work as far as possible. But I had recently read Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Introduction to The African Trilogy and what I had been thinking about Joseph Conrad being a racist came back to me yet again. Adichie, recapitulating Achebe's "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness", wrote, "[Conrad] had failed to hold an authorial rejection of that world-view [the racism of the time]". Throughout the work, I was trying to find if Okonkwo's misogyny has an "authorial rejection" and I am glad that I found, at least that's what I think. It was through Uchendu, Okonkwo's mother's younger brother, that Achebe had pacified the fire of supposed misogyny that was seething in me. He said, "It's true that a child belongs to his father. But when a father beats his child, it seeks sympathy in its mother's hut. A man belongs to his father-land when things are good and life is sweet. But when there is sorrow and bitterness he finds refuge in his motherland. Your mother is there to protect you. She is buried there. And that is why we say mother is supreme." ° Things Fall Apart is not meant just for a light reading, but also for going through its depth and exploring it even in its remotest corner.
  • I have always had intense admiration for writers who, through their journalistic way of writing, give a lot to think about. Chinua Achebe has taken this admiration to another height. He is easy to read, but difficult to access. He stated things as plainly as he could and leaves the burden of making out the undertones on his readers. To be honest, he leaves a lot on his readers. Things Fall Apart begins with the protagonist and the reminiscences of his father. Okonkwo is not in awe with his father's way of living and he carves out his own destiny. He is not one of those protagonists who, at first, made a place in my heart. It wasn't until Roshan (@flawed.poetry) rightfully pointed out the reason of his actions being that he was the member of a clan that I finally started taking his course of action in. I had been too carried away in the beginning because I wanted to know if the misogynistic narration is related to the author. I try to keep the artist away from his/her work as far as possible. But I had recently read Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Introduction to The African Trilogy and what I had been thinking about Joseph Conrad being a racist came back to me yet again. Adichie, recapitulating Achebe's "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness", wrote, "[Conrad] had failed to hold an authorial rejection of that world-view [the racism of the time]". Throughout the work, I was trying to find if Okonkwo's misogyny has an "authorial rejection" and I am glad that I found, at least that's what I think. It was through Uchendu, Okonkwo's mother's younger brother, that Achebe had pacified the fire of supposed misogyny that was seething in me. He said, "It's true that a child belongs to his father. But when a father beats his child, it seeks sympathy in its mother's hut. A man belongs to his father-land when things are good and life is sweet. But when there is sorrow and bitterness he finds refuge in his motherland. Your mother is there to protect you. She is buried there. And that is why we say mother is supreme." ° Things Fall Apart is not meant just for a light reading, but also for going through its depth and exploring it even in its remotest corner.
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  • bookerrands - ONLINE BOOKSTORE @bookerrands 2 days ago
  • #Saturdayreads
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Guess what bookies!
_
Who fears death has been optioned as a TV series for HBO and is now in early development which will be executive produced by George R.R Martin (Author of Game of Thrones)
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Who fears death is true African Fantasy. It tells the story of a girl who is a misfit in society and full of magic and anger. She ends up going on an epic journey with friends and a lover and faces things she could not have imagined. There are some really good plot twists and an unexpected end. I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy.
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Book is available in stock for N4,000. Simply send a DM or click link in bio to get a copy(s)
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📸 @jemma_reads #saturdayreads _ Guess what bookies! _ Who fears death has been optioned as a TV series for HBO and is now in early development which will be executive produced by George R.R Martin (Author of Game of Thrones) . Who fears death is true African Fantasy. It tells the story of a girl who is a misfit in society and full of magic and anger. She ends up going on an epic journey with friends and a lover and faces things she could not have imagined. There are some really good plot twists and an unexpected end. I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy. _ Book is available in stock for N4,000. Simply send a DM or click link in bio to get a copy(s) _ 📸 @jemma_reads
  • #saturdayreads _ Guess what bookies! _ Who fears death has been optioned as a TV series for HBO and is now in early development which will be executive produced by George R.R Martin (Author of Game of Thrones) . Who fears death is true African Fantasy. It tells the story of a girl who is a misfit in society and full of magic and anger. She ends up going on an epic journey with friends and a lover and faces things she could not have imagined. There are some really good plot twists and an unexpected end. I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy. _ Book is available in stock for N4,000. Simply send a DM or click link in bio to get a copy(s) _ 📸 @jemma_reads
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