San Francisco Botanical Garden

San Francisco Botanical Garden

Latest San Francisco Botanical Garden Instagram Posts

  • sfbotanicalgarden - San Francisco Botanical Garden @sfbotanicalgarden 3 weeks ago
  • This past weekend between the rains was pretty magical. Here is some photographic evidence from the one and only @saxonholt.
•
Rain has returned and we are now past peak magnolia bloom but the final wave of flowers has begun and includes several big, beautiful trees such as M. campbellii (formerly mollicomata) in the Moon Viewing Garden, M. x veitchii in the Rhododendron and Camellia Gardens, as well as delicate, smaller trees like M. stellata and M. laevifolia ‘Strybing Compact’. There are and will continue be plenty of gorgeous flowers to enjoy through March.
•
If you’d like to make your own magnificent magnolia haven at home come check out our first plant sale of 2019 this Saturday, 3/2, from 10am-2pm featuring Magnolias and companion plants. There are magnolias that can do well in a container and fit into small spaces. All other plant departments—California native plants, succulents, houseplants, ferns, etc.—will be well represented, too.
•
In addition to the Magnolias, the rest of the Garden is really coming alive. All this healthy rainfall and increasing day length has fresh foliage pushing and more rhododendron, camellia, daffodil, and other exciting spring bloomers like the Puya in the Succulent Garden looking to put on a show later this spring.
•
#magnificentmagnolias #sfbotanicalgarden This past weekend between the rains was pretty magical. Here is some photographic evidence from the one and only @saxonholt. • Rain has returned and we are now past peak magnolia bloom but the final wave of flowers has begun and includes several big, beautiful trees such as M. campbellii (formerly mollicomata) in the Moon Viewing Garden, M. x veitchii in the Rhododendron and Camellia Gardens, as well as delicate, smaller trees like M. stellata and M. laevifolia ‘Strybing Compact’. There are and will continue be plenty of gorgeous flowers to enjoy through March. • If you’d like to make your own magnificent magnolia haven at home come check out our first plant sale of 2019 this Saturday, 3/2, from 10am-2pm featuring Magnolias and companion plants. There are magnolias that can do well in a container and fit into small spaces. All other plant departments—California native plants, succulents, houseplants, ferns, etc.—will be well represented, too. • In addition to the Magnolias, the rest of the Garden is really coming alive. All this healthy rainfall and increasing day length has fresh foliage pushing and more rhododendron, camellia, daffodil, and other exciting spring bloomers like the Puya in the Succulent Garden looking to put on a show later this spring. • #magnificentmagnolias #sfbotanicalgarden
  • This past weekend between the rains was pretty magical. Here is some photographic evidence from the one and only @saxonholt. • Rain has returned and we are now past peak magnolia bloom but the final wave of flowers has begun and includes several big, beautiful trees such as M. campbellii (formerly mollicomata) in the Moon Viewing Garden, M. x veitchii in the Rhododendron and Camellia Gardens, as well as delicate, smaller trees like M. stellata and M. laevifolia ‘Strybing Compact’. There are and will continue be plenty of gorgeous flowers to enjoy through March. • If you’d like to make your own magnificent magnolia haven at home come check out our first plant sale of 2019 this Saturday, 3/2, from 10am-2pm featuring Magnolias and companion plants. There are magnolias that can do well in a container and fit into small spaces. All other plant departments—California native plants, succulents, houseplants, ferns, etc.—will be well represented, too. • In addition to the Magnolias, the rest of the Garden is really coming alive. All this healthy rainfall and increasing day length has fresh foliage pushing and more rhododendron, camellia, daffodil, and other exciting spring bloomers like the Puya in the Succulent Garden looking to put on a show later this spring. • #magnificentmagnolias #sfbotanicalgarden
  • 844 8
  • sfbotanicalgarden - San Francisco Botanical Garden @sfbotanicalgarden 1 month ago
  • PEAK MAGNOLIA BLOOM! No snow or storms could stop this year’s bloom which is at its best now and will continue through the next two weeks. Magnolias have weathered the rain and wind like champs, aren’t afraid of more on the way, and will be dancing in the beautiful blue skies until then. Come check out the biggest, most spectacular trees at their best now! 
#magnificentmagnolias #sfbotanicalgarden
•
(1) This M. campbellii in the Temperate Asia collection near the Main Gate and Great Meadow is peaking now.
•
(2) Our namesake, 80’ beauty M. campbellii ‘Strybing White’ in the Moon Viewing Garden is an absolute must-see in full bloom.
•
(3) Another towering tree introduced at the Garden, M. campbellii ‘Late Pink’ is right on time in the Rhododendron Garden and still has more flowers to come.
•
(4) There are several M. denudata throughout the Garden but this one in the Moon Viewing Garden in tandem with ‘Strybing White’ puts on a must-see show. M. denudata has the longest known history of cultivation among magnolias, dating back to the Tang Dynasty – 618 A.D.
•
(5) We are constantly adding to the Garden’s magnolia collection and many of the smaller, younger trees like this one in the Rhododendron Garden have lower flowers that allow you to really get up close and personal.
•
(6) M. sargentiana was planted in what is now the New Zealand collection long before that parameter was established. Present at the signing of the United Nations Charter, which took place at Cathedral Grove in Muir Woods, Lord Cranborne of Salisbury presented this plant to the Garden in 1946. It flowered for the first time in 1953 and continues to look amazing today.
•
(7) M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’ is thought by many to be the most spectacular of all the magnolias that bloom at the Garden. This Himalayan selection was propagated from a tree at the Lloyd Botanic Garden in Darjeeling, India, and offers magnificent deep pink flowers emerging on leafless branches for a dramatic display in the Temperate Asia collection.
•
(8) One more view of M. campbellii ‘Strybing White’ from the hill above it—this huge tree requires multiple vantage points to be fully appreciated. PEAK MAGNOLIA BLOOM! No snow or storms could stop this year’s bloom which is at its best now and will continue through the next two weeks. Magnolias have weathered the rain and wind like champs, aren’t afraid of more on the way, and will be dancing in the beautiful blue skies until then. Come check out the biggest, most spectacular trees at their best now! #magnificentmagnolias #sfbotanicalgarden • (1) This M. campbellii in the Temperate Asia collection near the Main Gate and Great Meadow is peaking now. • (2) Our namesake, 80’ beauty M. campbellii ‘Strybing White’ in the Moon Viewing Garden is an absolute must-see in full bloom. • (3) Another towering tree introduced at the Garden, M. campbellii ‘Late Pink’ is right on time in the Rhododendron Garden and still has more flowers to come. • (4) There are several M. denudata throughout the Garden but this one in the Moon Viewing Garden in tandem with ‘Strybing White’ puts on a must-see show. M. denudata has the longest known history of cultivation among magnolias, dating back to the Tang Dynasty – 618 A.D. • (5) We are constantly adding to the Garden’s magnolia collection and many of the smaller, younger trees like this one in the Rhododendron Garden have lower flowers that allow you to really get up close and personal. • (6) M. sargentiana was planted in what is now the New Zealand collection long before that parameter was established. Present at the signing of the United Nations Charter, which took place at Cathedral Grove in Muir Woods, Lord Cranborne of Salisbury presented this plant to the Garden in 1946. It flowered for the first time in 1953 and continues to look amazing today. • (7) M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’ is thought by many to be the most spectacular of all the magnolias that bloom at the Garden. This Himalayan selection was propagated from a tree at the Lloyd Botanic Garden in Darjeeling, India, and offers magnificent deep pink flowers emerging on leafless branches for a dramatic display in the Temperate Asia collection. • (8) One more view of M. campbellii ‘Strybing White’ from the hill above it—this huge tree requires multiple vantage points to be fully appreciated.
  • PEAK MAGNOLIA BLOOM! No snow or storms could stop this year’s bloom which is at its best now and will continue through the next two weeks. Magnolias have weathered the rain and wind like champs, aren’t afraid of more on the way, and will be dancing in the beautiful blue skies until then. Come check out the biggest, most spectacular trees at their best now! #magnificentmagnolias #sfbotanicalgarden • (1) This M. campbellii in the Temperate Asia collection near the Main Gate and Great Meadow is peaking now. • (2) Our namesake, 80’ beauty M. campbellii ‘Strybing White’ in the Moon Viewing Garden is an absolute must-see in full bloom. • (3) Another towering tree introduced at the Garden, M. campbellii ‘Late Pink’ is right on time in the Rhododendron Garden and still has more flowers to come. • (4) There are several M. denudata throughout the Garden but this one in the Moon Viewing Garden in tandem with ‘Strybing White’ puts on a must-see show. M. denudata has the longest known history of cultivation among magnolias, dating back to the Tang Dynasty – 618 A.D. • (5) We are constantly adding to the Garden’s magnolia collection and many of the smaller, younger trees like this one in the Rhododendron Garden have lower flowers that allow you to really get up close and personal. • (6) M. sargentiana was planted in what is now the New Zealand collection long before that parameter was established. Present at the signing of the United Nations Charter, which took place at Cathedral Grove in Muir Woods, Lord Cranborne of Salisbury presented this plant to the Garden in 1946. It flowered for the first time in 1953 and continues to look amazing today. • (7) M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’ is thought by many to be the most spectacular of all the magnolias that bloom at the Garden. This Himalayan selection was propagated from a tree at the Lloyd Botanic Garden in Darjeeling, India, and offers magnificent deep pink flowers emerging on leafless branches for a dramatic display in the Temperate Asia collection. • (8) One more view of M. campbellii ‘Strybing White’ from the hill above it—this huge tree requires multiple vantage points to be fully appreciated.
  • 2039 22