San Diego, California

San Diego, California

Latest San Diego, California Instagram Posts

  • vatcheshakarian - Vatche Shakarian @vatcheshakarian 16 minutes ago
  • @hooper.fit If you think about it, eating according to a clock kinda makes us do dumb stuff. It doesnโ€™t exactly encourage us to think and act for ourselves.

Why are we eating if weโ€™re not even considering whether weโ€™re actually hungry or not? Shouldnโ€™t we be asking ourselves if weโ€™re still full from our previous meal?

And the coaches who perpetuate this? Itโ€™s just straight up lazy coaching. It takes the ownership off of the client and puts it on a cookie cutter plan that they feel reliant on.

The solution?

Learning how to trust yourself by asking yourself the important questions:
.
โ–ช๏ธAm I hungry?
โ–ช๏ธHow hungry?
โ–ช๏ธWhat do I want to eat?
โ–ช๏ธWould I feel disgusting after eating it?
โ–ช๏ธCan I wait another 30 minutes before eating?

So, whatโ€™s the deal with encouraging you to wait 30-60 minutes before it's time to grub? Itโ€™s a practice to help you get to used to feeling the sensation of hunger.

Through this, you will begin to trust that itโ€™s not an emergency situation that needs to be extinguished RIGHT NOW.

I want you to experience what it feels like to sit with hunger and not be in a constant state of starving or stuffed. This also encourages you to check in with yourself, โ€œWhat can I eat that will leave me feeling satisfied, but not uncomfortably full?โ€
.
So, yeah. Practicing mindfulness with hunger is really just asking you to think for yourself, isn't it? Novel concept, right?

Thereโ€™s a lot of fear around hunger. Weโ€™re scared what might happen if we allow ourselves to get too hungry and end up spiraling into a full-blown binge. Thatโ€™s normal, but itโ€™s also the unhealthy mindset of a food-obsessed person who wants to be in constant control.

So, instead, Iโ€™m asking you to try something different. Relinquish the control, and learn to TRUST yourself.

Whatโ€™s the worst that could happen? Youโ€™ll always have the safety net of your old ways if my suggestion doesnโ€™t work. The restrictive food rules and meal plans will always be there.

If you want to break-free from the shackles of chronic dieting, youโ€™re going to have to be willing to try something new. And learning how to trust yourself is the first step. @hooper.fit If you think about it, eating according to a clock kinda makes us do dumb stuff. It doesnโ€™t exactly encourage us to think and act for ourselves. Why are we eating if weโ€™re not even considering whether weโ€™re actually hungry or not? Shouldnโ€™t we be asking ourselves if weโ€™re still full from our previous meal? And the coaches who perpetuate this? Itโ€™s just straight up lazy coaching. It takes the ownership off of the client and puts it on a cookie cutter plan that they feel reliant on. The solution? Learning how to trust yourself by asking yourself the important questions: . โ–ช๏ธAm I hungry? โ–ช๏ธHow hungry? โ–ช๏ธWhat do I want to eat? โ–ช๏ธWould I feel disgusting after eating it? โ–ช๏ธCan I wait another 30 minutes before eating? So, whatโ€™s the deal with encouraging you to wait 30-60 minutes before it's time to grub? Itโ€™s a practice to help you get to used to feeling the sensation of hunger. Through this, you will begin to trust that itโ€™s not an emergency situation that needs to be extinguished RIGHT NOW. I want you to experience what it feels like to sit with hunger and not be in a constant state of starving or stuffed. This also encourages you to check in with yourself, โ€œWhat can I eat that will leave me feeling satisfied, but not uncomfortably full?โ€ . So, yeah. Practicing mindfulness with hunger is really just asking you to think for yourself, isn't it? Novel concept, right? Thereโ€™s a lot of fear around hunger. Weโ€™re scared what might happen if we allow ourselves to get too hungry and end up spiraling into a full-blown binge. Thatโ€™s normal, but itโ€™s also the unhealthy mindset of a food-obsessed person who wants to be in constant control. So, instead, Iโ€™m asking you to try something different. Relinquish the control, and learn to TRUST yourself. Whatโ€™s the worst that could happen? Youโ€™ll always have the safety net of your old ways if my suggestion doesnโ€™t work. The restrictive food rules and meal plans will always be there. If you want to break-free from the shackles of chronic dieting, youโ€™re going to have to be willing to try something new. And learning how to trust yourself is the first step.
  • @hooper.fit If you think about it, eating according to a clock kinda makes us do dumb stuff. It doesnโ€™t exactly encourage us to think and act for ourselves. Why are we eating if weโ€™re not even considering whether weโ€™re actually hungry or not? Shouldnโ€™t we be asking ourselves if weโ€™re still full from our previous meal? And the coaches who perpetuate this? Itโ€™s just straight up lazy coaching. It takes the ownership off of the client and puts it on a cookie cutter plan that they feel reliant on. The solution? Learning how to trust yourself by asking yourself the important questions: . โ–ช๏ธAm I hungry? โ–ช๏ธHow hungry? โ–ช๏ธWhat do I want to eat? โ–ช๏ธWould I feel disgusting after eating it? โ–ช๏ธCan I wait another 30 minutes before eating? So, whatโ€™s the deal with encouraging you to wait 30-60 minutes before it's time to grub? Itโ€™s a practice to help you get to used to feeling the sensation of hunger. Through this, you will begin to trust that itโ€™s not an emergency situation that needs to be extinguished RIGHT NOW. I want you to experience what it feels like to sit with hunger and not be in a constant state of starving or stuffed. This also encourages you to check in with yourself, โ€œWhat can I eat that will leave me feeling satisfied, but not uncomfortably full?โ€ . So, yeah. Practicing mindfulness with hunger is really just asking you to think for yourself, isn't it? Novel concept, right? Thereโ€™s a lot of fear around hunger. Weโ€™re scared what might happen if we allow ourselves to get too hungry and end up spiraling into a full-blown binge. Thatโ€™s normal, but itโ€™s also the unhealthy mindset of a food-obsessed person who wants to be in constant control. So, instead, Iโ€™m asking you to try something different. Relinquish the control, and learn to TRUST yourself. Whatโ€™s the worst that could happen? Youโ€™ll always have the safety net of your old ways if my suggestion doesnโ€™t work. The restrictive food rules and meal plans will always be there. If you want to break-free from the shackles of chronic dieting, youโ€™re going to have to be willing to try something new. And learning how to trust yourself is the first step.
  • 4 1