The New York Times @nytimes

nytimes

The New York Times Telling visual stories 👀

The New York Times (@nytimes) Recent Photos and Videos

  • “It’s 2019: Nudes are the currency of love,” Zendaya's character explains in the first episode of the new TV series “Euphoria,” which debuts on HBO Sunday. Zendaya’s character, Rue, plays a high school junior committed to numbing herself with vodka and whatever drugs she can get her hands on after a failed stint in rehab. It’s a far cry from Zendaya’s 8-year run as a Disney Channel star. “It’s a scary jump,” Zendaya said of her role in “Euphoria.” “But I think it was time for me to do this.” She’s confident the “Euphoria” audience is unlikely to overlap with Disney’s target demographic. “I don’t think any of my 8-year-old fans know” that this show exists, she said, smiling. “If they do, I don’t think their parents will let them watch it.” Read more of our interview with @zendaya at the link in our profile. @chantalaanderson shot this photo.
  • “It’s 2019: Nudes are the currency of love,” Zendaya's character explains in the first episode of the new TV series “Euphoria,” which debuts on HBO Sunday. Zendaya’s character, Rue, plays a high school junior committed to numbing herself with vodka and whatever drugs she can get her hands on after a failed stint in rehab. It’s a far cry from Zendaya’s 8-year run as a Disney Channel star. “It’s a scary jump,” Zendaya said of her role in “Euphoria.” “But I think it was time for me to do this.” She’s confident the “Euphoria” audience is unlikely to overlap with Disney’s target demographic. “I don’t think any of my 8-year-old fans know” that this show exists, she said, smiling. “If they do, I don’t think their parents will let them watch it.” Read more of our interview with @zendaya at the link in our profile. @chantalaanderson shot this photo.
  • 19817 0 14 hours ago
  • There's nothing complicated about this potato salad. It's really just boiled potatoes, a simple Dijon vinaigrette and fresh herbs. That's it. Get @williamnorwich's recipe for Potato Salad With Dijon Vinaigrette at the link in our bio and follow @nytcooking for more recipes, both simple and complex. Photo by @krausfoto6.
  • There's nothing complicated about this potato salad. It's really just boiled potatoes, a simple Dijon vinaigrette and fresh herbs. That's it. Get @williamnorwich's recipe for Potato Salad With Dijon Vinaigrette at the link in our bio and follow @nytcooking for more recipes, both simple and complex. Photo by @krausfoto6.
  • 40694 0 22 hours ago
  • She's the queen of eating shellfish on the internet. Bethany Gaskin (@bloveslife2) claims that eating giant crab legs on YouTube has made her a millionaire. That's because she's a celebrity in the world of #mukbang, an internet phenomenon that involves eating outsize portions on camera. 🦀 Get all you can eat at the link in our bio. Photograph by @maddiemcgarvey for @nytimesfashion.
  • She's the queen of eating shellfish on the internet. Bethany Gaskin (@bloveslife2) claims that eating giant crab legs on YouTube has made her a millionaire. That's because she's a celebrity in the world of #mukbang, an internet phenomenon that involves eating outsize portions on camera. 🦀 Get all you can eat at the link in our bio. Photograph by @maddiemcgarvey for @nytimesfashion.
  • 27134 0 1 day ago
  • Meet Frank, Tun, Colt and Bailey. They’re among the 55 dogs  on active duty or in training at Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola who patrol the prison’s borders, sniff for narcotics, search for escapees and provide support to infirm and elderly inmates. (Frank tracks escaped prisoners; Tun and Colt are in training; Bailey was a washout as an explosives dog but will soon be certified as a narcotics dog.) Dogs have always been an integral part of prison life at Angola, which is America’s largest maximum-security prison. Two years ago, the prison started a volunteer program that trains service dogs to help veterans. Swipe right to see more good dogs, and visit the link in our profile to read more from @nytopinion about how the program is changing prison life at Angola. @fredrconrad shot these photos.
  • Meet Frank, Tun, Colt and Bailey. They’re among the 55 dogs on active duty or in training at Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola who patrol the prison’s borders, sniff for narcotics, search for escapees and provide support to infirm and elderly inmates. (Frank tracks escaped prisoners; Tun and Colt are in training; Bailey was a washout as an explosives dog but will soon be certified as a narcotics dog.) Dogs have always been an integral part of prison life at Angola, which is America’s largest maximum-security prison. Two years ago, the prison started a volunteer program that trains service dogs to help veterans. Swipe right to see more good dogs, and visit the link in our profile to read more from @nytopinion about how the program is changing prison life at Angola. @fredrconrad shot these photos.
  • 34453 0 1 day ago
  • 20 years ago, a new game appeared in American arcades: Dance Dance Revolution. Players hit floor pads in sync with arrows that fly past on the cabinet’s screen in time to a relentless dance beat. Skilled players aim for “full combos” — not missing any of the steps. In Manhattan, only 2 DDR machines now remain in arcades, but they maintain a devoted following. Keya You, who plays at Dave & Buster’s in Times Square, said “Everyone there is trying to get better, but it’s not one of those games where you get better by bringing other people down.” Visit the link in our profile to meet more die-hard #DanceDanceRevolution players. Video by @canepari_til_i_die
  • 20 years ago, a new game appeared in American arcades: Dance Dance Revolution. Players hit floor pads in sync with arrows that fly past on the cabinet’s screen in time to a relentless dance beat. Skilled players aim for “full combos” — not missing any of the steps. In Manhattan, only 2 DDR machines now remain in arcades, but they maintain a devoted following. Keya You, who plays at Dave & Buster’s in Times Square, said “Everyone there is trying to get better, but it’s not one of those games where you get better by bringing other people down.” Visit the link in our profile to meet more die-hard #dancedancerevolution players. Video by @canepari_til_i_die
  • 6733 0 1 day ago
  • The best women's soccer team in the world is fighting for the World Cup title in France ... and also for equal pay at home. The U.S. women's national team is the best in the world and has been for decades. Since the FIFA Women’s World Cup was inaugurated in 1991, the United States has won 3 of the 7 titles, including the most recent one in 2015. And on March 8 of this year, they sued the United States Soccer Federation, claiming “purposeful gender discrimination.” “The bottom line is simple,” the star defender Becky Sauerbrunn said in a statement. “It is wrong for us to be paid and valued less for our work because of our gender.” Catch the game today and read more from @nytmag about their ongoing fight for equal pay at the link in our bio. @dina_litovsky photographed Mallory Pugh (@malpugh, at right) during a match against Belgium on April 7.
  • The best women's soccer team in the world is fighting for the World Cup title in France ... and also for equal pay at home. The U.S. women's national team is the best in the world and has been for decades. Since the FIFA Women’s World Cup was inaugurated in 1991, the United States has won 3 of the 7 titles, including the most recent one in 2015. And on March 8 of this year, they sued the United States Soccer Federation, claiming “purposeful gender discrimination.” “The bottom line is simple,” the star defender Becky Sauerbrunn said in a statement. “It is wrong for us to be paid and valued less for our work because of our gender.” Catch the game today and read more from @nytmag about their ongoing fight for equal pay at the link in our bio. @dina_litovsky photographed Mallory Pugh (@malpugh, at right) during a match against Belgium on April 7.
  • 35934 0 1 day ago
  • The New York Times has obtained a preliminary design of the Harriet Tubman $20 bill, pictured above. The image of the bill, which was to be the first to bear the face of an African-American, was previously unreleased. The Trump administration announced last month that it would delay the release of the design by 6 years, citing technical reasons. The change would push completion of the imagery past President Trump’s time in office, even if he wins a second term, stirring speculation that Mr. Trump had intervened to keep his favorite president, Andrew Jackson, a fellow populist, on the front of the bill. Click the link in our bio to learn more about the bill and the plans for its release. #💵
  • The New York Times has obtained a preliminary design of the Harriet Tubman $20 bill, pictured above. The image of the bill, which was to be the first to bear the face of an African-American, was previously unreleased. The Trump administration announced last month that it would delay the release of the design by 6 years, citing technical reasons. The change would push completion of the imagery past President Trump’s time in office, even if he wins a second term, stirring speculation that Mr. Trump had intervened to keep his favorite president, Andrew Jackson, a fellow populist, on the front of the bill. Click the link in our bio to learn more about the bill and the plans for its release. #💵
  • 52885 0 1 day ago
  • Hootie & the Blowfish is a great American rock band. Yes, really. The band that produced “Cracked Rear View,” one of the albums that defined  the 1990s and spawned the Top 10 hits “Hold My Hand,” “Let Her Cry” and “Only Wanna Be With You,” has generally been reviled, shrugged off or forgotten. But it’s time for a reassessment, according to our pop music critic, Jon Caramanica. “At its peak, Hootie & the Blowfish was a genuinely excellent band,” @joncaramanica writes. “This is perhaps one of the last unpopular opinions.” Visit the link in our profile to read more in defense of the band, and share your thoughts in the comments below. @lovebryan shot this photo.
  • Hootie & the Blowfish is a great American rock band. Yes, really. The band that produced “Cracked Rear View,” one of the albums that defined the 1990s and spawned the Top 10 hits “Hold My Hand,” “Let Her Cry” and “Only Wanna Be With You,” has generally been reviled, shrugged off or forgotten. But it’s time for a reassessment, according to our pop music critic, Jon Caramanica. “At its peak, Hootie & the Blowfish was a genuinely excellent band,” @joncaramanica writes. “This is perhaps one of the last unpopular opinions.” Visit the link in our profile to read more in defense of the band, and share your thoughts in the comments below. @lovebryan shot this photo.
  • 18676 0 2 days ago
  • The jazz funeral is perhaps New Orleans’s most emblematic ritual, dating to the late 1800s and the birth of jazz itself. It remains a powerfully transcendent rite, and a preferred way for black New Orleans to honor its revered dead. Slow dirges give way to joyous, uptempo numbers and cathartic dancing as the body is “cut loose,” and the soul ascends to heaven. When Leah Chase, the celebrated Creole chef and civil rights icon, died on June 1 at age 96, there was no question that her city would say farewell with a jazz funeral. On Monday afternoon, pallbearers emerged from St. Peter Claver Catholic Church with Mrs. Chase’s coffin. Hundreds were there to greet her. Soon they fell in line behind her hearse as it carried her on her last trip through the streets of the storied Treme neighborhood. Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our profile for the full story. @ek_the_pj shot these photos.
  • The jazz funeral is perhaps New Orleans’s most emblematic ritual, dating to the late 1800s and the birth of jazz itself. It remains a powerfully transcendent rite, and a preferred way for black New Orleans to honor its revered dead. Slow dirges give way to joyous, uptempo numbers and cathartic dancing as the body is “cut loose,” and the soul ascends to heaven. When Leah Chase, the celebrated Creole chef and civil rights icon, died on June 1 at age 96, there was no question that her city would say farewell with a jazz funeral. On Monday afternoon, pallbearers emerged from St. Peter Claver Catholic Church with Mrs. Chase’s coffin. Hundreds were there to greet her. Soon they fell in line behind her hearse as it carried her on her last trip through the streets of the storied Treme neighborhood. Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our profile for the full story. @ek_the_pj shot these photos.
  • 18312 0 2 days ago
  • Who can adopt a Native American child? A bitter custody battle over this question is playing out in a Texas court. A white couple who adopted a Navajo boy, Zachary, is also trying to adopt his half sister (pictured in the second photo), but U.S. federal law gives Native American families priority to adopt Native American children, and the little girl’s great-aunt would also like to adopt her. Should tribal ties be the deciding factor in determining who gets custody? Tribes say yes. A federal judge says no. A lawyer for the family who adopted Zachary says the law “was about stopping unjustified breakups of Indian families, but this child has never lived in an Indian family.” “Our Navajo children are sacred to us,” says a social worker from the Navajo Nation. “We have our traditions, our ceremonies and our language handed down to our children. We don’t want to lose that.” The case is now before a federal appeals court. Whoever loses is almost certain to ask the Supreme Court to hear it. Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our profile to read the full story. @ilanapl and @allisonvsmith shot these photos.
  • Who can adopt a Native American child? A bitter custody battle over this question is playing out in a Texas court. A white couple who adopted a Navajo boy, Zachary, is also trying to adopt his half sister (pictured in the second photo), but U.S. federal law gives Native American families priority to adopt Native American children, and the little girl’s great-aunt would also like to adopt her. Should tribal ties be the deciding factor in determining who gets custody? Tribes say yes. A federal judge says no. A lawyer for the family who adopted Zachary says the law “was about stopping unjustified breakups of Indian families, but this child has never lived in an Indian family.” “Our Navajo children are sacred to us,” says a social worker from the Navajo Nation. “We have our traditions, our ceremonies and our language handed down to our children. We don’t want to lose that.” The case is now before a federal appeals court. Whoever loses is almost certain to ask the Supreme Court to hear it. Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our profile to read the full story. @ilanapl and @allisonvsmith shot these photos.
  • 19343 0 2 days ago
  • Where’s Norman Rockwell when you need him? On June 28, 1956, a 5-year-old named Steven was one of the many children at Grand Central Terminal heading off to summer camp, in his case Camp Deerfield in Wilmington, Vermont. Sleepaway camps emerged  in the late 1880s to counter the pernicious trends of mollycoddling and “indoor-ness.” Separating from their kids has not gotten easier for parents in the decades since. Helene Drobenare, executive director of Camp Young Judaea Sprout Lake, has seen enough teary-eyed parents that she has a speech prepared: “I say, ‘When you say goodbye to John, Jim, Sally, whoever you say goodbye to, you’re going to keep those sunglasses down, you’re going to hold back those tears as much as you can, and you’re going to smile with those teeth out. The most important thing you’re going to do is give your kids the message that you believe in them … When you turn around and you’re rolling out of the gate, you can cry all the way down the road — and there’s a liquor store where you can stop and get your first bottle of wine.” Photographs by Meyer Liebowitz, Barton Silverman and Steve Zavatski. Follow @nytarchives for more #tbt photos and click the link in our bio for more photos of summer camp fun.
  • Where’s Norman Rockwell when you need him? On June 28, 1956, a 5-year-old named Steven was one of the many children at Grand Central Terminal heading off to summer camp, in his case Camp Deerfield in Wilmington, Vermont. Sleepaway camps emerged in the late 1880s to counter the pernicious trends of mollycoddling and “indoor-ness.” Separating from their kids has not gotten easier for parents in the decades since. Helene Drobenare, executive director of Camp Young Judaea Sprout Lake, has seen enough teary-eyed parents that she has a speech prepared: “I say, ‘When you say goodbye to John, Jim, Sally, whoever you say goodbye to, you’re going to keep those sunglasses down, you’re going to hold back those tears as much as you can, and you’re going to smile with those teeth out. The most important thing you’re going to do is give your kids the message that you believe in them … When you turn around and you’re rolling out of the gate, you can cry all the way down the road — and there’s a liquor store where you can stop and get your first bottle of wine.” Photographs by Meyer Liebowitz, Barton Silverman and Steve Zavatski. Follow @nytarchives for more #tbt photos and click the link in our bio for more photos of summer camp fun.
  • 38562 0 2 days ago
  • Russell Harvard wants to know why there’s a TV show about meerkats but not one about deaf people. “Are the writers afraid of writing deaf characters? Are we too complex?” he asked. In the Broadway production of “King Lear,” which closed June 9, Russell, 38, played the Duke of Cornwall, a role in which he translated Shakespeare’s language into American sign language. In the 2007 movie “There Will Be Blood,” Russell played another deaf character and used a vintage form of sign language: signing “small,” as he put it. “Now we sign bigger," he said. “There’s a lot more facial expression. Back in earlier decades, facial expression was very limited. We were a lot more stoic when we signed, because we didn’t want to be too intrusive with hearing people in their environment.” Read more at the link in our profile. @nate_nate shot this photo.
  • Russell Harvard wants to know why there’s a TV show about meerkats but not one about deaf people. “Are the writers afraid of writing deaf characters? Are we too complex?” he asked. In the Broadway production of “King Lear,” which closed June 9, Russell, 38, played the Duke of Cornwall, a role in which he translated Shakespeare’s language into American sign language. In the 2007 movie “There Will Be Blood,” Russell played another deaf character and used a vintage form of sign language: signing “small,” as he put it. “Now we sign bigger," he said. “There’s a lot more facial expression. Back in earlier decades, facial expression was very limited. We were a lot more stoic when we signed, because we didn’t want to be too intrusive with hearing people in their environment.” Read more at the link in our profile. @nate_nate shot this photo.
  • 12462 0 3 days ago