Monterey Bay Aquarium @montereybayaquarium

montereybayaquarium

Monterey Bay Aquarium 🌊 Dive into the wonders of the sea and our mission to conserve the ocean! 🐙 montereybayaquarium.org 🐟 @SeafoodWatch

Monterey Bay Aquarium (@montereybayaquarium) Recent Photos and Videos

  • TUBE ANEMONE 1: … gotta keep your friends close and your anemones closer! 😆
TUBE ANEMONE 2: 🤦‍♀️
TUBE ANEMONE 1: c’mon these puns are anemoney lololol
TUBE ANEMONE 2: s t o p
TUBE ANEMONE 1: … it tentickles? 🤣
TUBE ANEMONE 2: 🙄 ugh with friends like these-
TUBE ANEMONE 1: 👀
TUBE ANEMONE 2: wait, no, NOOOOOOOO-
.
#montereybayaquarium #whoneedsanemones #uhusobvi #tubularpuns
  • TUBE ANEMONE 1: … gotta keep your friends close and your anemones closer! 😆 TUBE ANEMONE 2: 🤦‍♀️ TUBE ANEMONE 1: c’mon these puns are anemoney lololol TUBE ANEMONE 2: s t o p TUBE ANEMONE 1: … it tentickles? 🤣 TUBE ANEMONE 2: 🙄 ugh with friends like these- TUBE ANEMONE 1: 👀 TUBE ANEMONE 2: wait, no, NOOOOOOOO- . #montereybayaquarium #whoneedsanemones #uhusobvi #tubularpuns
  • 4653 22 3 days ago
  • Un-bird-lievable! Even in its mottled in-between-seasons plumage, our red phalarope is ridiculously photogenic.

Red phalaropes make impressive migrations every year, nesting in the Arctic tundra during the summer and spending the rest of the year out at sea feasting on plankton. While in most bird species, males dress to impress with bright, beautiful breeding plumage, phalaropes have reversed the roles—females are larger, more colorful, and compete to win mates, while the males incubate and care for their eggs and chicks.
#montereybayaquarium #bluesteel #letigre #waterandtheessenceofbeauty
  • Un-bird-lievable! Even in its mottled in-between-seasons plumage, our red phalarope is ridiculously photogenic. Red phalaropes make impressive migrations every year, nesting in the Arctic tundra during the summer and spending the rest of the year out at sea feasting on plankton. While in most bird species, males dress to impress with bright, beautiful breeding plumage, phalaropes have reversed the roles—females are larger, more colorful, and compete to win mates, while the males incubate and care for their eggs and chicks. #montereybayaquarium #bluesteel #letigre #waterandtheessenceofbeauty
  • 4094 18 5 days ago
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  • 21171 395 1 week ago
  • With Facebook and Instagram down yesterday, we took a little time to practice some self-care. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Without a layer of blubber to insulate them against chilly waters, sea otters must keep their thick fur coats impeccably groomed. A million hairs per square inch trap layers of air to keep a sea otter dry and toasty, but it’s quite the feat to keep their coat in good condition—they’ll spend nearly a third of the day grooming to get ready for their next bout of foraging. Looks like this one was getting its face especially ready for Pi Day! 
#montereybayaquarium #seaotter #selfcare #pidaygameface
  • With Facebook and Instagram down yesterday, we took a little time to practice some self-care. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Without a layer of blubber to insulate them against chilly waters, sea otters must keep their thick fur coats impeccably groomed. A million hairs per square inch trap layers of air to keep a sea otter dry and toasty, but it’s quite the feat to keep their coat in good condition—they’ll spend nearly a third of the day grooming to get ready for their next bout of foraging. Looks like this one was getting its face especially ready for Pi Day! #montereybayaquarium #seaotter #selfcare #pidaygameface
  • 20228 504 1 week ago
  • Behold the fish-eating siphonophore 𝐸𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑛𝑎 𝑠𝑖𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑎! This delicate denizen of the deep is a predator of petite pisces in the vast midwater of the Monterey Bay. 
Siphonophores are colonies of stinging animals working together to make a living—kind of like a naked, swimming coral reef. The individuals that comprise the front half of this colonial animal are specialized for swimming, and those in the back for reproduction and feeding. The fish-eating siphonophore attracts prey by wiggling an array of glowing red lures, luring imprudent fishes to a venomous doom.

Our colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute @mbari_news use their deep-sea robots to study these fascinating and fragile animals in their natural habitat. This kind of exploration is all very new—all of us reading this Instagram caption right now among the first humans to be able to witness this kind of deep-sea creature that we share so much of our planet with—and that’s just pretty darn cool, tbqh. #montereybayaquarium #MBARImondays
  • Behold the fish-eating siphonophore 𝐸𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑛𝑎 𝑠𝑖𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑎! This delicate denizen of the deep is a predator of petite pisces in the vast midwater of the Monterey Bay. Siphonophores are colonies of stinging animals working together to make a living—kind of like a naked, swimming coral reef. The individuals that comprise the front half of this colonial animal are specialized for swimming, and those in the back for reproduction and feeding. The fish-eating siphonophore attracts prey by wiggling an array of glowing red lures, luring imprudent fishes to a venomous doom. Our colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute @mbari_news use their deep-sea robots to study these fascinating and fragile animals in their natural habitat. This kind of exploration is all very new—all of us reading this Instagram caption right now among the first humans to be able to witness this kind of deep-sea creature that we share so much of our planet with—and that’s just pretty darn cool, tbqh. #montereybayaquarium #mbarimondays
  • 4431 41 1 week ago
  • Happy #InternationalWomensDay, Instagram! We have to give a big shout out to our Executive Director, Kelp Afishionado and Boss Lady Supreme, Julie Packard, and all of the incredible and diverse women around the Aquarium who inspire us to care more and do more for the ocean every day.

Women have always played a central role in ocean conservation, and in our history as an Aquarium. Julia Platt, the then 74-year-old mayor of Pacific Grove in 1931, set up the Pacific Grove Marine Gardens, the first such protected underwater area in California. Her gardens are now part of the Hopkins State Marine Reserve, which begins at the Aquarium’s pump-house and runs down the coast to Lovers Point.

And it was at Hopkins Marine Station that many students saw Rachel Carson’s “The Sea Around Us” come alive to them—Rachel’s message of conservation inspiring a generation of ocean enthusiasts to love the ocean deeper. (One of @mbari_news’s vessels is now named the “RV Rachel Carson” in her honor.) And then, it was in these same tidepools and underwater marine gardens that the idea for the Monterey Bay Aquarium was first sprouted, an idea that held fast and established itself inside the dilapidated cannery next door.

And when the Aquarium opened in 1984, it was a young phycologist and algae-enthusiast who led the Aquarium on its journey: our Executive Director Julie Packard. Her leadership in ocean conservation, whether overseeing the launch of @seafoodwatch, speaking for the ocean at the Global Climate Action Summit or supervising the building of our new Bechtel Center for Ocean Education and Leadership further down Cannery Row, has had a global impact for the sea.

We’re all very proud to have Julie as our leader, especially knowing that she’s still the passionate seaweed enthusiast she’s always been, exploring the protected tide pools with a firm commitment to preserving them for the next generation.
  • Happy #internationalwomensday, Instagram! We have to give a big shout out to our Executive Director, Kelp Afishionado and Boss Lady Supreme, Julie Packard, and all of the incredible and diverse women around the Aquarium who inspire us to care more and do more for the ocean every day. Women have always played a central role in ocean conservation, and in our history as an Aquarium. Julia Platt, the then 74-year-old mayor of Pacific Grove in 1931, set up the Pacific Grove Marine Gardens, the first such protected underwater area in California. Her gardens are now part of the Hopkins State Marine Reserve, which begins at the Aquarium’s pump-house and runs down the coast to Lovers Point. And it was at Hopkins Marine Station that many students saw Rachel Carson’s “The Sea Around Us” come alive to them—Rachel’s message of conservation inspiring a generation of ocean enthusiasts to love the ocean deeper. (One of @mbari_news’s vessels is now named the “RV Rachel Carson” in her honor.) And then, it was in these same tidepools and underwater marine gardens that the idea for the Monterey Bay Aquarium was first sprouted, an idea that held fast and established itself inside the dilapidated cannery next door. And when the Aquarium opened in 1984, it was a young phycologist and algae-enthusiast who led the Aquarium on its journey: our Executive Director Julie Packard. Her leadership in ocean conservation, whether overseeing the launch of @seafoodwatch, speaking for the ocean at the Global Climate Action Summit or supervising the building of our new Bechtel Center for Ocean Education and Leadership further down Cannery Row, has had a global impact for the sea. We’re all very proud to have Julie as our leader, especially knowing that she’s still the passionate seaweed enthusiast she’s always been, exploring the protected tide pools with a firm commitment to preserving them for the next generation.
  • 6988 49 2 weeks ago